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3

If it's still fermenting, you're likely just experiencing the hops still in suspension. After fermentation is complete, a LOT of this material and the associated bitterness will drop out of suspension. In other words, it is very normal for a beer, of ANY style, to taste very bitter after just 3 days of fermentation, then to have it all mellow out after the ...


3

Let it go. Hops contain enzymes so you are likely seeing renewed fermentation which could continue in the bottles or keg if you package it too quickly. Concerns regarding prolonged contact with dry hops are largely overblown. In my experience you are unlikely to experience any detrimental effects for several more weeks and it will not take that long for ...


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The main indication would be to measure the final gravity of the wort, don't look at the activity in the airlock. However, if you kept it in a room without too much temperature variation at ambient temperature, it should be finished. W.r.t. to the dry hop, my experience is that it is more dependent upon the variety of the hops if you get off-flavors from ...


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What hops is totally up to you, but I prefer to choose falvoring hops over bittering hops since cider has more than enough bitterness in general. You can use about 5g of hops per liter of cider and let it sit for 3 to 7 days. Ideally you will dry hop when primary fermentation is finished and after racking at least once. Some people have suggested making ...


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Beer-N-BBQ by Larry says hops absorb 0,0033L of wort per gram. I don't know where the value actually comes from though.


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I'm not a professional chemist so I can't recommend any quantitative tests, but you could make a controlled subjective comparison against a package of purchased hops with known alpha acid content. The goal is not an exact number but a relative bitterness. Micro batches of a quart to 1/2 gallon size using either sugar water or a basic light malt extract, use ...


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