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7

If stored properly (no humidity and at room temperature or lower) the DME should preserve itself at least for a year. It has been discussed before: How long will an extract kit stay good? In your case, if the seal was good, after a month it should still be fresh and you can use it without concerns... Manufacturers will mention that "Storing opened bags ...


6

Specific gravity measures density, which is mass/volume. If you measured the total mass of your system (3000g + 300g) you would have gotten 3300 grams, but the volume is not 3000 ml because you added the DME and it increases the volume of the solution. If the volume increased by 174 ml you would get 3300/3174 = 1.040 for the density. In other words, the ...


4

I bulk prime with DME, so it takes me 3 to 6 months to use a 1kg bag. I reseal the bag quickly, and place it in an airtight plastic container after pouring out the amount I require. No observable deterioration takes place.


3

'Is it simply a matter of stirring continuously?' Pretty much, especially with DME. Once it's dissolved fully, though, there should be no further need to stir. So really 'continuously-until-it's-dissolved'. I find it helps to add DME slowly while stirring or whisking continuously, until it has all been added, and then continue to stir until visible signs (...


3

DME loves to suck up humidity and turn to a brick of sugar if it can. What I do is cut the corner off the DME bag. Using a large mouth plastic bottle (gatorade) cut the top off 1 inch from the cap. Remove the lid and stuff the cut corner of the DME bag up through and fold back. Replace the cap for a nice airtight seal. Then I store the DME with my ...


3

I would assume they mean liquid malt extract as the specifically mention dry light malt extract below.


3

There are two key variables in a yeast starter - the volume of wort and the gravity of the wort. The volume principally determines how many cells you get out of the starter. The gravity also has some affect, but most texts recommend a gravity in the range 1.030-1.040. This is to avoid too high stresses on the yeast, and also because oxygen dissolves more ...


3

Stored cool, dry and out of sunlight, DME is good for 2+ years. The main issue is with it picking up moisture, when it then becomes clumpy. But once boiled it's still good and you can use it up to 5 years in small quantities (say 1-2lb/0.5-1kg in a 5 gallon batch.)


2

From the first item in the search results for "briess dme shelf life": Briess "Product Information & Typical Analysis" sheet for a similar DME [PDF Warning] STORAGE AND SHELF LIFE Store in a cool, dry location. Unopened bags best if used within 24 months from date of manufacture.


2

It matters a little bit. The advice I've seen is that a wort of around 1.040 is best for a yeast starter, presumably because that's the optimal level of fermentables for yeast propagation. 1/2 cup of DME in 500ml of water yields a gravity around 1.040. So the wort from 1 cup in 800ml will have a higher gravity -- somewhere around 1.065. The yeast will not ...


2

I take it out of the bag and put it in a bowl or something to pour from. Then I pour slowly while stirring. Minimal clumpage.


2

(1) Yes, you can use a mix of DME and LME in your recipe, but it will affect your recipe. You would be better off using all Bavarian wheat DME. The classic recipe book, Brewing Classic Styles, calls for an American Wheat Ale, for example, to be made from 100% wheat LME having a color of 4°L on the Lovibond scale. Using less wheat will de-emphasize the "...


2

Based on Northwestern's website (http://www.northwesternextract.com/brewing/malt/), their Gold LME is equivalent to light LME (not extra light) from other companies. It falls right in between their Extra Light and Amber LMEs. Based on this Home Brew Talk thread (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/what-gold-lme-126714/), the last post explains that Briess also ...


2

DMe has about 45 ppg. That's points per lb. per gal. So one lb. of DME in one gal. of water yields a gravity of 1.045. Divide by 5 for 5 gal. and you get 1.009. So, in a 5 gal. batch, you get 9 gravity points out of 1 lb. of DME. 5 lb. in 5 gal. will get you 1.045 OG. Cane sugar has about the same ppg. Honey is around 32 ppg. Using all of that, if ...


2

Couple tips for DME You just want the water warm when adding it. 100°F is fine. What you don't want is boiling or any steam, or it will clump before even touching the water making mixing a pain. Once the "warm" wort is clump free from manual mixing then start your heat. Carmelizing will only happen if you get clumps of DME or LME sitting on the direct ...


2

My bet is that your beer was underattenuated in the first place. Since you're brewing with extract-only, I guess you're a beginner and might have neglected on making a healthy yeast pitch (no offence meant, we've all been there). "No action in the bubbler" is not a sign of completed fermentation - always measure the gravity and ensure you've reached the ...


1

Your target beer is an American pale ale which can have Carmel color variants from 5-10 SRM / 9.8-19.7 EBC. I'm not sure what that specific beers color is. Going darker will have more Carmel flavor and slightly sweeter perception. Any extract derived from 2-row yielding the above color range is a pale malt.


1

Along with the stirring it helps to turn off the heat before adding the extracts. Preheating the water helps get extract to dissolve faster. If you are using a gas stove top just turn it off. If you are using an electric stove top move the pot off the element as it will still be hot. Get the water moving and add the extract a little at a time. A good ...


1

It's too late for this beer in my opinion. Adding DME+water could work at a really high concentration. I have never done this, but there's no reason why that wouldn't work. But that seems more trouble than its worth to me. A new starter should not be necessary. To be honest, you should have left the extra sugar out. That's just going to thin it out and ...


1

I use DME for bottle priming, and occasionally I will add some to my wort. To avoid clumping, I place the desired amount of DME into a sanitized plastic bottle, add some hot water and cap. The DME gradually dissolves, but I give the bottle a few shakes if I wish to speed up the dissolving process. When fully dissolved, I pour contents of bottle into ...


1

DME is very easy to work with when adding to cool water. It's a pain to add to hot wort (like a late addition) as the heat makes it clump. If you are adding it to wort (like from steeping grains), it's easiest to add it to a separate container with cool water and stirred first. In the end, the yeast will eat the clumps, but it makes it near impossible to get ...


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