19

A while ago I visited a local meadery and chatted with the brewer (meader?). He was planning on making use of a local micro-distiller's equipment to produce a spirit from his mead. I asked him the name of the resulting product, and his answer was "distilled mead". Not the answer I was hoping for. I've never tasted such a thing and suspect that the subtle ...


12

According to Wikipedia there doesn't appear to be much in the way of a family name for it: Mead (Wikipedia). I think the closest would be "Midus" Midus: Lithuanian for mead, made of natural bee honey and berry juice. Infused with carnation blossoms, acorns, poplar buds, juniper berries and other herbs, it is often made as a mead distillate or mead nectar,...


11

Start with a sterile carboy, airlock, funnel, and cold pressed apple cider. Don't use anything that has preservatives in it. Pitch in a Campden tablet per gallon of juice to kill any unidentified bacteria or yeast. Let sit for 24 hours then pitch in some champagne or cider yeast. Watch it ferment. Save some 2 litre bottles in the meantime. When the brew is ...


9

No way. You will kill everything in your beer at this temperature. The pasteurization process actually uses lower temps, probably with less exposure time, and kills them all. And its ok to use any beer yeast to carbonation, you don't need the same strain.


8

I once heard a name for this called "drakas"(spelling). As told it was a Norse drink made by placing a bowl of honey mead outside overnight. In the morning, chip off the ice and repeat a few times untill a thick drink was the result.


8

My grandfather, who was also a bootlegger during prohibition, used to make huge batches of apple jack in wooden barrels. He said they'd smash up ripe apples, fill the barrels to the top, packed with the crushed apples, and then add well water until it just showed. Then they'd pour in "A shit-load of sugar" my grandfathers words, and lay the barrel top ...


7

At this point in the process, you're pretty much committed to letting the ferment continue to completion. With fruit wine, the usual course of action is to add meta-bisulphite to the juice or pulp, and leave it for 24 hours before adding the yeast. The sulphite reduces the activity of wild yeasts and bacteria, giving the brewer's yeast a head start. If the ...


7

Assuming that all of the proceeding is accurate, would it not just be a "honey brandy"? I can imagine a very sweet flavor with an interesting aroma and probably fairly drinkable if not pleasant flavor. I know that mead was popular in Egypt, Turkey, etc. since the dawn of civilization and you can't be the first person in human history to think of this so I ...


6

I have my own family recipe that I have recently cooked off made from clover honey. We have always called it honeydew whiskey even though it does not meet description standards of whiskey. Its what I have heard several old timers call it


6

Aguardente de mel is what we call it in portuguese... Literal translation to english is Honey's burning water


6

Methanol in cider can be a problem. It's much higher in apple juice than beer. The boiling point of methanol is 148°F(64.7°C) so if you want to boil it off before the Ethanol, boiling point 173°F (78.37°C) you could do that. Bring up to temperature for a few minutes should be enough to blow off the methanol leaving most of the ethanol behind. But this might ...


5

I agree that keeping an opened packet of dry yeast at room temp for some time will decrease the viability of the stored yeast. Maybe a hydration mix or growing on in a starter might have helped but it would have been preferable to use new yeast. Many yeasts will metabolise sucrose (table sugar). It is cleaved and converted to glucose by sucrase and ...


5

I wouldn't worry about it. The methanol concentrated by freeze concentration of your cider wouldn't even be close to the acceptable amounts of methanol that's in commercial vodka.


4

There is nothing new. Distilled mead is called "mead balsam", at least in Lithuania, where "midus" (mead) was an ancient drink, later one factory tried to distill it. Please google for such drinks as "Suktinis" or "Zalgiris" (which is 75% strong)...Also see midus.lt In my personal opinion, mead (real matured mead, and the best mead shall be matured at least ...


4

While I personally lean on the side of calling distilled mead a honey brandy, I would agree with most people that commented so far. There is not a clear category in which to fit a honey-sourced distilled alcohol. The average person is likely to view mead as a honey-based wine. But, this is not technically correct since a wine is made from fruit, ...


4

If you're talking about Scotch whisky, the answer is yes! And it's known as "distiller's beer", made from just barley, yeast, and water. Some more info here: http://www.maltmadness.com/malt-whisky/beginners-guide-04-distilling.html


4

After I made my still, I was anxious to get started distilling. I had a five gallon carboy of strawberry mead that was made to about 15% ABV and was less than a year old,so I used that. It was wonderful right off the still, with flavors from both the strawberries and the honey. I double distilled, using a stripping run and a spirit run. It was good clear, ...


4

In general, yeast will die at temps exceeding 115F.


4

You will not achieve 40% using fermentation as the only technique. Yeast have a certain alcohol tolerance that is usually between 14% and 18% (wine yeast), above that percentage, yeast will stop working. Depending of your yeast strain (check the yeast pack for this information), it should stop working around the alcohol tolerance (more or less). To ...


4

You can't determine the alcohol content simply by measuring gravity. We need more information. Let's try to determine the alcohol by volume in your "best" result beer. For starters, it has gravity of 1.032 which translates into 83 grams of sugar per one liter of beer. Tools we need to calculate the alcohol content: pycnometer sensitive scale Steps: 1) ...


3

Turbo yeast is faster than beer yeast, so no bacteriae have much chances to proliferate. Even if there is a bacterial or wild yeast infection no one cares, as that fermented stuff is distilled. For that matter, whisky distillers don't sterilize their wort before fermenting it, and some level of bacterial infection is considered necessary for the traditional ...


3

To be clear you will not produce anything like apple wine as you will be distilling the product and all non-volatile compounds will be lost. You will be producing an apple brandy. Your final yield and the quality of that yield will be determined by how well you can control the temperature of the vapor at the still head and the plate equivalency of your ...


3

You are right to be concerned about methanol it is a very nasty poison. You are at a lower risk of building up a dangerous level of methanol from all grain fermentation as it produces roughly 1/10 the amount of methanol as grape or fruit fermentation. I don't know about sugar water fermentation but as it lacks any pectin or cellulose it should be cleaner ...


2

When I have distilled mead, I have called it "Mead Moonshine" when un-oaked and either "Mead Whiskey" or "Mead Brandy" when oaked. Although the name "Mead whiskey" is not very accurate, the product tastes more like whiskey than brandy to me. If you were to make mead with some fruit (pears, strawberry's, oranges etc) I would go with "Mead(& <fruit&...


2

Whiskey is typically made primarily from corn (fermented in the same way as beer) and then distilled. The trick is, after distillation it has to be aged in wood barrels for a couple years, which is what gives it the flavor and color. Technically you can distill beer. If you do it a couple times you'll basically end up with the same spirit, which can then be ...


2

I went looking for this answer and found the following: Although Ninemaidens Gwires is a marketed brand for distilled mead, it is not a true name for this liquor as Gwires is a generic term used for 'alcoholic spirit'. However; I found Medovača (pronounced medovacha) in Croatia. This is not a faux version of Honey Brandy (ie: clean spirit like vodka or ...


2

Well if we were going to vote on it mine would be Midus. It has been said a few times here and I think it's the most appropriate. It stands on it's own and doesn't need brandy, whisky, jack, or anything else acting as a crutch. Also it usually has that nice golden color so it makes a nice parallel with King Midus from Greek mythology that turned everything ...


2

I grew up making beer, hard cider(a type of wine), applejack(concentrated hard cider through freezing) and wine at home. My father's friends made corn whiskey and gin. I have done hours of internet searches about various alcohols and have come to these conclusions. Whiskey is distilled from beer(Beer is from fermented grains). Brandy is distilled from wine(...


2

I would like to argue that distilled mead is not a brandy product as brandy is distilled wine and i believe the distinction for wine is a fermentation from fruit or berries. Honey is a sugar product and its my opinion that it should therefore be considered a Rum.


2

In the US by law it can not be called brandy or whiskey or rum, or any other standard category. It is a "distilled spirit specialty", to which one can fix a "fanciful name" and a "description". We at Quincy Street Distillery1 have made such a spirit for 5 years, just distilled mead, we call it "honey spirit", which also happens to be the European Union ...


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