Hot answers tagged

8

How are you measuring gravity? I would double-check your gravity readings. If you are using a refractometer, you'll need to correct your reading because they are not meant to be used after fermentation begins (because of the presence of alcohol). If you're using a hydrometer, you need to de-gas your fermented sample enough to ensure that your hydrometer ...


2

This question isn't easy to answer - at best it's subjective as to whether it will be the result you want or not. I don't know the final gravity or IBUs that this recipe will produce - I could find out, but then so can you with the free tools available - simply put your batch size and the ingredients into a recipe calculator like brewtoad to determine the ...


1

I was using a refractometer and I failed to account for the EtOH in the solution. Using the link, I was able to calculate that the ABV was actually 4.3% rather than 3%. After I posted my original question, I had raised the temp to 62 degrees for a two day rest and then dropped it down to a lagering temp. I am proud to report that he final ABV is ...


1

1.053 to 1.031 is only 41% apparent attenuation. I can't imagine that 20% crystal malt would produce enough unfermentable sugars for such low attenuation. Another source of unfermentatable sugars is a high mash temperature. Again, it would be difficult to get such a low attenuation from mash temperature number even if you were trying. I think one of two ...


1

I decided to make some very pale bitter ("golden ale") for a change, with no addition of my normal 250g of standard crystal malt. So the only ingredient were my usual Maris Otter pale malt 2.5Kg/5 gallons, 100g pale rye malt 100g torrefied wheat. That makes an everyday brew of about 3.5% alcohol. The rye and wheat were added for flavour (rye) and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible