Hot answers tagged

6

Brewing textbooks I referred to universally state that the gap between the rollers of the mill needs to be much closer together for wet-milling. You don't mention making any adjustments, so I'll assume you didn't. Since the husk is made more elastic by conditioning, the dangers of pulverizing it with too tight a mill are eliminated, and in fact it may do a ...


5

Clarity of wort has no bearing on the clarity of the finished beer. Beer clarity is much more dependent on things like proper pH and mash conversion an d a large amount of flour should have no effect. My crush is very fine with a large amount of flour and my efficiency ranges from 80-85%. Based on that, it's difficult to believe your wort loss is solely ...


4

One can wash the grapes to remove "detritus from the field" but it is not really necessary unless the grapes are horribly soiled - and then one might ask why one is making wine from them anyway! But it is possible to wash grapes and if one does it is also a good idea to let them dry as far as is possible to reduce extraneous liquid diluting the must. In ...


4

No, I don't think a smaller crush will cause haze. The flour particles are fairly heavy and will clump together in the boil, and would definitely drop out during primary. (I use a fine crush and have not seen haze from that.) For other causes of haze, see What causes cloudiness in beer?


3

A good crush should keep the grain husks intact, since they will then filter out the flour and provide an efficient lauter. I also crush reasonably finely, which does produce some flour, but as long as the husks are intact you're good. I have a 3 roller mill - the sales pitch was that it doesn't pulverize the husks as much as a 2 roller. I've not used a 2 ...


3

Why risk contamination? You spend so much on supplies and grapes are a natural product. There can be all sorts of things hidden on them that could destroy your end product.


3

Any oil will prevent rust, but would not last as long as grease. You can use a vegetable/olive oil for parts that are inside/in contact with the fruit. Bike chain lube is designed to stick to a chain that will move fast and even generate heat, so it will work as well as grease. It come in spray so it is very easy to apply. I would use this for the chain. ...


2

I had a crusher just like that for a long time. You want to use food grade oil or grease. You can find this easily. Olive Oil will work in a pinch. I used Weston food grade silicone spray on many different pieces of equipment from pumps to crushers. Weston Food Grade Silicone spray You should've spent more and got the stainless crusher model. The painted ...


2

I have found this to be a food-safe option: http://www.petrolgel.com/ Sanitary Petro Gel from McGlaughlin Oil Company. I reapply after each cleaning cycle (after a crush).


2

The manufacturer indicates the use of grease. Once washing is completed, if the machine is not to be used for a long period of time, proceed as follows: Open the carter that protects machine gear. Grease all chains, internal gear, supports Grease the roller and the agitator support I got the info from here I wouldn't use olive oil.


2

I know wikihow.com says to rinse. However, the general consensus within the home winemaking community is that washing the grapes will water down the flavor. This is from many posts I've read on winemakingtalk.com


2

One of my earlier attempts was to use a manual pasta maker in place of a crusher. First, I took out rollers and roughed and knurled them as much as possible using a couple files. Then I screwed it onto a board, removed the handle and attached an electric drill. Overall, it worked, and I went through a couple bags of grain with it (50kg total), but then it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible