3

Split the batch of high SG wine into two. A larger batch and a smaller batch - eg. 1/4 and 3/4. Water down the smaller batch until it gets to (say) S.G. 1.090 or 1.10. Check with hydrometer and don't dlute too much. Make up a fresh batch of yeast in water add a little sugar and check the yeast is fermenting after (say) 1 hour. if it isn't frothing or ...


2

Aging in the carboy or demijohn or whatever is called bulk aging. Once it's bottled, it's called bottle aging. As you have noticed, it's different, and primarily results from the volume of the container. Large containers age slower than smaller ones, however you want to bulk age so it's all aging together before you divide it out into individual bottles. ...


2

Depending on how their processed, adding beetroot to a fermenting wine must should not do anything to inhibit fermentation. Unless your beet must is full of sorbates or other preservatives, it should be fine. If you're mostly going for color, in the future I would add them towards the end of fermentation, as active fermentation seems to scrub out some of the ...


2

Calcium is not going to be an issue. The sorbate as a preservative is likely going to be an issue. Pitch more yeast than you think you need to overcome the preservative.


2

No need to worry. Since you already racked your wine once (from primary to secondary) you already gotten rid of most of gross lees. Fine lees are less problematic, and can remain for a few weeks without problems. You may rack your wine again to clarify it further. People usually have a racking schedule, and rack as many times as they want (depends on ...


2

Adding water will dilute the flavor and depending on the quantity, it could be too much dilution. Another option is to blend with another wine, if you have more than one batch going. And finally, you can add some fruit juice to it, but make sure there isn't too much sugar in the juice, otherwise the problem will remain. Juice would be a better option than ...


1

It would not be fortified as you are not adding alcohol to it, thereby fortifying it. It would be more akin to a Brandy on a technical level as you are using a methoid of distilation to concentrate the alcohol. But, my guess is it would leave you with a drink more similar to a fortified wine sherry/port than a brandy as freeze distilling to 30%+ is difficult,...


1

When you bottle do you add a yeast inhibitor like Camden / Potassium Metabisulfide? Or do you allow bottle conditioning to produce some carbonation? Both methods for still or carbonated wine have an impact on the finished flavor. Slightly more attenuated carbonation adds a little bite to flavor and dryer mouthfeel. Camden depletes oxygen to prevent further ...


1

It will be fine. Just keep it covered from light and cool. Make sure your air-lock doesn't lose it's fluid in the move. Only concern is if your changing elevation from high to low by 2-3k feet, you may suck in fluid from the air-lock. If this is the case just cover the fermentor with sanatized foil, use a lot and try to go down the sides 3-5 inches from the ...


1

Two things. You can delay the wine but picking and freezing the flowers. Should not effect the flavor or quality. Second thing, a demijohn, carboy or whatever is like a giant bottle so in effect if you have all your chemistry (sulfites and such) at the right levels and you can move the demijohn with care, it should change nothing. The caveat to that is if ...


1

A recipe for damson (sweet) wine from C.J.J. Berry - First Steps in Winemaking, I have not made this wine, but the ones I have made were excellent. 1.75Kg Damsons; 0.25kg barley (crushed); 1.75Kg Sugar; 4.5l Water; Pectic Enzyme; Yeast and Yeast Nutrient. Stone and cut up fruit, place damsons and barley in a pan and pour over boiling water, cover and ...


1

Things to buy, obtainable from your local homebrew shop for pretty cheap: Wine yeast Sanitizing agent (I use Potassium metabisulfites) A tube for siphoning About actually making the wine, the process is the following: Sanitize everything that touches the soon-to-be wine Wash the berries. If you want to be extra cautious, you can boil them in just enough ...


1

I would: first freeze the gooseberries to break the cell walls. Then I would quickly boil them up with some sugar to steralise them. Then I would let it cool in a covered pan. once cool, place into demijon then add paectin and yeast to the mixture. Wait 2 weeks rack into a secondary wait one week and then bottle. I'd also get a copy of this book: http://...


1

Try siphoning off a glass of the wine and adding a pinch of BiCarbonate of Soda or Calcium Carbonate, give it a good stir and see how it turns out.


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