Hot answers tagged

9

I advise looking at HotHead from Omega Labs: http://www.omegayeast.com/portfolio/14158-2/ Flocculation: Medium-High Attenuation: 75-85% Temperature Range: 62-98° F (16-37° C) Alcohol Tolerance: 11% ABV


8

This is a type of counter flow chiller. The manufacturer should have some specs on it. Mainly what the heat exchange efficiency is at specific GPMs. For example 100% eff at 1gpm wort and 1gpm coolant. Would mean the wort and coolant exit at the same temperature. All chillers of this type can get 100% efficiency but the flow may have to be so low it's ...


7

No, there is nothing necessarily wrong about using topping off water to cool your wort. But there normally isn't enough topping off water to cool the wort to pitching temperature by itself without applying an additional cooling method (the math is below). One reason to cool quickly to ideal yeast-pitching temp is to allow the yeast to get a nice head start ...


6

Son of a Fermentation Chiller Look up "son of a fermentation chiller". This is a two-chamber box made out of styrofoam insulation. It has a temperature controller and a fan. You load one chamber up with bottles of frozen water, and the temperature controller determines when to pump cold air into the brew chamber. I made mine in an afternoon*, and it has no ...


5

It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


5

There are a lot of products that are available. Most are a heatsink or piezo electric coolers, claiming to cool 30° below ambient. Really depends on your fermenter type carboy, bucket etc. It's worth a Google. Having not tried them I can't point you to a good one. BrewJacket is the only one that I've seen that interest me.


5

If your beer really is stale, that would mean that you have a problem with the caps on your bottles because of the low temperature, and that somehow your CO2 escapes and oxygen enters. However, at lower temperatures, more CO2 dissolves in your beer. If you keep your beer really at 4° C, that is very low. My experience is that keeping a beer for a couple of ...


5

I don't live in a tropical climate, but summers here get quite hot (chicago IL) during the summer I use a Large rubbermade Tote, and fill it with water and put my fermentation buckets into it. it keeps my temperature stable around 70F, and if I need to get it to a lower temp, I add Ice, or frozen water bottles to it.


4

I doubt this is a case of "stale beer" - I suppose it is just not very carbonated for service at a cold temperature. The metal cap of a beer bottle tends to shrink faster than the glass so the cap becomes more firmly attached as the temp drops. It is possible that the cap is badly fitted and that may affect gas tightness, but this is rare. Crown corks are ...


4

Because you are brewing a small batch, I think that an ice bath will be quite sufficient, however you muct add more ice at regular intervals. I also suggest adding salt to your ice so that the melting point of the ice is raised. Keep a lot of ice at your service and remember to stir!


4

I have done this with a 10 liter (2.5 gal) stock pot in my kitchen sink when I started brewing, also batches from 1 to 1.5 gallon. I did two things. In the first step I cooled by letting water flow from the faucet on the outside area of the pot. I do have a detachable faucet which does make this easier. In the second step, after sufficiently cooling (to ...


4

Most often than not, from the "overall temperature", beer quality depends on the temperature over the first 1-2 days of fermentation. Make sure you cool your wort well after boiling, and pitch the yeast at temperatures not higher than 16-18C. The "swamp cooler" works because water evaporates from the wet cloth wrapped around the fermenter -- in the same way ...


3

You can put a wet tshirt or towel over your fermenter and have the evaporation cool the fermenter. Like with the ice water bucket, you'll have to check back on it every once in a while and change the tshirt or towel.


3

Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


3

I use two of the above methods. I purchase two gallons of purified water and put them in the freezer. I get them slushy and add them to my wort while it sits in a sink of cold water with two bags of ice added. So far so good!


2

Passive Cooling: I seal up the wort and leave it overnight in a room tempurature area or outside, whatever. If the area is too cold, I check the wort starting at about 6 hours, so it doesnt get too cold to pitch. The only con I am aware of is the time it takes, but I bet it affects the flavor somehow, too. Anyway, I've won a few awards just doing this, so ...


2

If it's a style suited to souring, maybe it'll end up interesting… :S But you left un-sterilized sugar-water alone for 6 days. Bacteria reproduce really fast, much faster than yeast actually, but the side-effects of a healthy pitch of yeast usually crowd them out. I don't have high hopes. If you're limited on fermenter space, dump it and get the next ...


2

I place the fermentation vessel in a room that naturally has lower temperature than I desire for fermentation. Then I place a small heater inside the room and control power to the heater with a temperatur sensitive socket insert. That way I use the rooms natural temperatur to lower the fermentation temperature, and the heater to increase it. This works nice ...


2

I use the brew bag here. I throw a couple of 12oz frozen water bottles in there, and it drops the temp from room temp about 4-5 degrees. I switch them out 1-2 times a day. In my case, since I'm only doing ales, that works as I keep the temperature about 66-68 degrees.


2

I do this with some of my five gallon batches. I have a rather big deep sink. I buy a couple of bags of ice and put the whole pot in there and fill with ice and water. It cools down quickly enough. Works fine if you don't have access to a wort chiller. I have seen people in northern climates put their hot wort in the snow. Works well in Canada in the middle ...


2

Never had bottle bombs, but what I would do is the following: refrigerate all bottles, and carefully open and re-cap each one. You release the extra pressure, when opening the bottle and will stop the yeast from producing more CO2 with cooling the beer.


2

I am with barking.pete and chthon on this but would go even further in assuming that something with the carbonation process itself is off. In my (for obvious reasons limited) experience of opening warm beer bottles, there should be much more than just foam and some carbonation if you open a well carbonated homebrew at room temperature. So I assume that the ...


2

If you have or can arrange an abundant supply of ice, this old-style (and low-tech) soda fountain solution may work for you: http://www.sodadispenserdepot.com/how-it-works/ Scroll down till you see the cold plate, OK? I looked into these because I happened to pick one up for cheap at a garage sale. Never actually used it, though, so I can't tell you how ...


2

This seems to defy the laws of physics. When cooling with an ice bath, be sure to stir the wort when you think it is at the right temperature, and then measure again. Do not just take measurements at different positions in the wort. Make sure that the temperature is homogeneous by stirring it gently.


1

Kveik yeast are also being recommended : Which are the good yeasts and beer styles for fermenting at higher temperatures? It can get as hot as 40º C


1

Brewpi and an old fridge that someone has given up on and has set on the side of the road waiting for trash pick up. Hack the fridge with brewpi like components and control your fermentation remotely.


1

25 min is not too bad, you can reduce flow rate, to increase transfer time but this adds time to your brew day. Or you can use colder water if you get your counter-flow water down to 40F then you will either be able to increase the flow rate or reduce the temperature of your wort. You don't want to pump the wort for 2 reasons: 1. will likely increase flow ...


1

There is one correct place: The same place that you used last time. :) The critical part is that you take a reading at the same place as this will give you consistency in your process. There is one "bad" place: the bottom of the kettle. Depending on your equipment you may get a high reading because the thick bottom is retaining heat, or showing a very low ...


1

I think stirring is required even if you are running a watery mash with recirculation; you have to at least break up the clumps of dry grain before you can pump it. Heat doesn't seem to move easily through the mash anyways. Wort that is above the chiller will chill very, very slowly. I find that some wort will also stay hot on the bottom of my pot (on the ...


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