Hot answers tagged

9

I always thought of this as being a HUGE no no. But I guess not...below is from John Palmer. People often wonder about adding ice directly to the cooling wort. This idea works well if you remember a couple key points. Never use commercial ice. It can harbor dormant bacteria that could spoil your beer. Always boil the water before freezing it in ...


9

I advise looking at HotHead from Omega Labs: http://www.omegayeast.com/portfolio/14158-2/ Flocculation: Medium-High Attenuation: 75-85% Temperature Range: 62-98° F (16-37° C) Alcohol Tolerance: 11% ABV


8

This is a type of counter flow chiller. The manufacturer should have some specs on it. Mainly what the heat exchange efficiency is at specific GPMs. For example 100% eff at 1gpm wort and 1gpm coolant. Would mean the wort and coolant exit at the same temperature. All chillers of this type can get 100% efficiency but the flow may have to be so low it's ...


7

No, there is nothing necessarily wrong about using topping off water to cool your wort. But there normally isn't enough topping off water to cool the wort to pitching temperature by itself without applying an additional cooling method (the math is below). One reason to cool quickly to ideal yeast-pitching temp is to allow the yeast to get a nice head start ...


6

Son of a Fermentation Chiller Look up "son of a fermentation chiller". This is a two-chamber box made out of styrofoam insulation. It has a temperature controller and a fan. You load one chamber up with bottles of frozen water, and the temperature controller determines when to pump cold air into the brew chamber. I made mine in an afternoon*, and it has no ...


5

If your beer really is stale, that would mean that you have a problem with the caps on your bottles because of the low temperature, and that somehow your CO2 escapes and oxygen enters. However, at lower temperatures, more CO2 dissolves in your beer. If you keep your beer really at 4° C, that is very low. My experience is that keeping a beer for a couple of ...


5

I don't live in a tropical climate, but summers here get quite hot (chicago IL) during the summer I use a Large rubbermade Tote, and fill it with water and put my fermentation buckets into it. it keeps my temperature stable around 70F, and if I need to get it to a lower temp, I add Ice, or frozen water bottles to it.


5

There are a lot of products that are available. Most are a heatsink or piezo electric coolers, claiming to cool 30° below ambient. Really depends on your fermenter type carboy, bucket etc. It's worth a Google. Having not tried them I can't point you to a good one. BrewJacket is the only one that I've seen that interest me.


5

It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


5

Hehe, bad idea - you couldn't have a beer on brewday since you'd have to stay sober to handle this with appropriate care! But seriously, I'm wondering that if you have to ask the question about suitability then you are probably not familiar with handling liquid nitrogen. As well as getting suitable training, you would need equipment that is designed to ...


5

This is how I do all of my brews. I usually boil about 11/12L for a 20/21L batch, put a filter over the primary bucket, pour the wort in from a bit of a height to help aerate, add ice until I get the right temperature then top up with water. The "right temperature" might be a couple of degrees above / below target, depending on whether the top up water is ...


4

You could buy or build a jockey box. It's just a coil of stainless steel or copper immersed in ice with a spigot at one end a quick release at the other, all inside an insulated container. It doesn't cool the keg down, but rather cools the beer as you're serving it.


4

I doubt this is a case of "stale beer" - I suppose it is just not very carbonated for service at a cold temperature. The metal cap of a beer bottle tends to shrink faster than the glass so the cap becomes more firmly attached as the temp drops. It is possible that the cap is badly fitted and that may affect gas tightness, but this is rare. Crown corks are ...


4

I have done this with a 10 liter (2.5 gal) stock pot in my kitchen sink when I started brewing, also batches from 1 to 1.5 gallon. I did two things. In the first step I cooled by letting water flow from the faucet on the outside area of the pot. I do have a detachable faucet which does make this easier. In the second step, after sufficiently cooling (to ...


4

Because you are brewing a small batch, I think that an ice bath will be quite sufficient, however you muct add more ice at regular intervals. I also suggest adding salt to your ice so that the melting point of the ice is raised. Keep a lot of ice at your service and remember to stir!


4

Most often than not, from the "overall temperature", beer quality depends on the temperature over the first 1-2 days of fermentation. Make sure you cool your wort well after boiling, and pitch the yeast at temperatures not higher than 16-18C. The "swamp cooler" works because water evaporates from the wet cloth wrapped around the fermenter -- in the same way ...


3

You can put a wet tshirt or towel over your fermenter and have the evaporation cool the fermenter. Like with the ice water bucket, you'll have to check back on it every once in a while and change the tshirt or towel.


3

Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


2

Passive Cooling: I seal up the wort and leave it overnight in a room tempurature area or outside, whatever. If the area is too cold, I check the wort starting at about 6 hours, so it doesnt get too cold to pitch. The only con I am aware of is the time it takes, but I bet it affects the flavor somehow, too. Anyway, I've won a few awards just doing this, so ...


2

Not really, unfortunately. Heating is a much easier mechanical process than cooling is, and as a result cooling applications tend to be more involved and more expensive. You have two options: 1) You could get a glycol chiller of some sort. A glycol chiller is usually a standard refrigerator compressor used to circulate liquid. Works well, but it's ...


2

I use two of the above methods. I purchase two gallons of purified water and put them in the freezer. I get them slushy and add them to my wort while it sits in a sink of cold water with two bags of ice added. So far so good!


2

If it's a style suited to souring, maybe it'll end up interesting… :S But you left un-sterilized sugar-water alone for 6 days. Bacteria reproduce really fast, much faster than yeast actually, but the side-effects of a healthy pitch of yeast usually crowd them out. I don't have high hopes. If you're limited on fermenter space, dump it and get the next ...


2

Dig a hole in your back yard! Seriously a small bunker type hole just big enough to fit your brew is fairly cheap to build. Build a well insulated roof for it, make sure it's sealed to keep out pests. Underground temperatures are much cooler than above ground in warm areas, and much warmer than above ground in cooler areas. The temperature stays fairly ...


2

If you have or can arrange an abundant supply of ice, this old-style (and low-tech) soda fountain solution may work for you: http://www.sodadispenserdepot.com/how-it-works/ Scroll down till you see the cold plate, OK? I looked into these because I happened to pick one up for cheap at a garage sale. Never actually used it, though, so I can't tell you how ...


2

I place the fermentation vessel in a room that naturally has lower temperature than I desire for fermentation. Then I place a small heater inside the room and control power to the heater with a temperatur sensitive socket insert. That way I use the rooms natural temperatur to lower the fermentation temperature, and the heater to increase it. This works nice ...


2

I use the brew bag here. I throw a couple of 12oz frozen water bottles in there, and it drops the temp from room temp about 4-5 degrees. I switch them out 1-2 times a day. In my case, since I'm only doing ales, that works as I keep the temperature about 66-68 degrees.


2

I am with barking.pete and chthon on this but would go even further in assuming that something with the carbonation process itself is off. In my (for obvious reasons limited) experience of opening warm beer bottles, there should be much more than just foam and some carbonation if you open a well carbonated homebrew at room temperature. So I assume that the ...


2

Never had bottle bombs, but what I would do is the following: refrigerate all bottles, and carefully open and re-cap each one. You release the extra pressure, when opening the bottle and will stop the yeast from producing more CO2 with cooling the beer.


2

I do this with some of my five gallon batches. I have a rather big deep sink. I buy a couple of bags of ice and put the whole pot in there and fill with ice and water. It cools down quickly enough. Works fine if you don't have access to a wort chiller. I have seen people in northern climates put their hot wort in the snow. Works well in Canada in the middle ...


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