5

Assuming you shoot for a saccharification rest around 65°C, the mash is heating up between ~1.4 and 1.8°C per minute. You'd make it through the 45-55° glucanase/protease range in ~5-7 minutes. I can't see this having a real effect on the wort composition, and I can't think of any other reason this technique would really make a difference. I'd say you'll be ...


4

Seems strange to me that so many people are prepared to trust their own "untested" experience to know when a mash has got complete conversion. Kind of like an electrician saying I've never tested if circuits are live before working on them so testing is a waste of time. I mean don't get me wrong, it is not the end of the the world if your mash did not ...


3

Simply exposing a wine that was inoculated with wine yeast to oxygen doesn't create acetic acid. You need to inoculate with some acetic acid bacteria as well. Acetic acid bacteria can ferment both sugars and ethanol to make acetic acid. I have made red wine before, and I have pulled a gallon of partially fermented wine, inoculated with acetobacter and ...


3

To start with, I'd figure out the yield as a percentage. I find this number way more useful, especially as maltsters generally provide a yield as a percentage on their analysis sheets. To do this, divide the ppg of the grain by 46 (sucrose ppg). That gives you the percentage of the weight of the grain that will become extract. e.g. 1.037 --> 37/46 = 80.4% ...


3

Its probably a good idea to do the test when you first go to all-grain using malted barley but once you are dialed it might be optional. HOWEVER, certain malted gluten free grains, such as millet and buckwheat for example, do not readily self convert. You can either do complex step mashes to achieve this, or do a simpler single infusion mash and add ...


3

I just use the same amount, under the idea that the different in weight is about the same as the difference in utilization. It just really does not matter at the end of the day; you're talking differences of "10%" with error bars of "5%".


2

Yes, there is a possibility to convert those starches into fermentable sugar, but it will depend on the source. With malt, the process of mashing consists in keeping the grain at a temperature to activate enzymes that will perform the starch conversion. Those enzymes are present in base malt (we call that the "diastatic power" of the malt). But those ...


2

The conventional wisdom rule of thumb is to use 10% less pellets than whole hops to maintain the bitterness. Notice I said bitterness...for later additions for flavor and aroma, a 1:1 ratio is fine.


2

Palmer is referring to U.S. customary measurements. One U.S. gallon is 3.79 liters. One liter is 0.26 U.S. gallons, or 1.05 U.S. quarts. For the U.S. customary measurement system-impaired (i.e., the whole world except the U.S and maybe parts of the U.K.), a U.S. quart is slightly smaller than a liter, and there are two 8-ounce cups in a pint, two 16-ounce ...


2

So it looks like your source just took an all-grain recipe and converted by just taking the base grain and subbing in light DME, and then using ALL the flavor grains in a steep. Typically, one would choose some darker malt extract to compensate for some of the steeping grains, such as Jordan suggested. However, yes, this is one way to do what you want. 7....


2

The Briess Typical Analysis Sheet might be of help. It lists Lovibond and Lintner for several Briess malts. It is from 2017, not sure how much things change over the seasons. If you give 'em a bunch of info, it looks like they'll give you access to the latest one. If it's still not what your looking for, they have Contact link where you could run the ...


2

Malting companies will provide the DP values for each malt (at least some do, ie: https://www.simpsonsmalt.co.uk/our-malts/finest-pale-ale-maris-otter/) The process of "roasting" malts (caramel, chocolat...) will decrease the value, so in general, speciality malts will have less DP. You may calculate an average DP for your recipe, but remember that ...


2

I was curious and poked around a little bit. I remembered reading that hydrometers were previously calibrated at 60°F, whereas nowadays they tend to be calibrated at 68°F. Brewer's Friend describes the older calibration at 59°F instead of 60°. → However, that temperature shift has barely any impact, not the 1.5%-2.5% difference you note. I also recalled ...


1

I've punched your numbers in, and it looks like 26.5L is probably close to the right number. It's not a very clear calculator though, so I would recommend heading to http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php/Understanding_Efficiency and reading up on the matter, then deciding what sort of efficiency you want to understand. Brewer's friend combines conversion and ...


1

LME already has some liquid in it. Making the yield slightly less than DME per volume but much more exaggerated when measured by weight. While maltsters do thier best for consistency yields will vary between batches and maltsters. So you really can't have any accurate static value of yield for LME / DME or even All Grain. Maltsters have data sheets for ...


1

Ian, is this the kind of device you are looking for: http://brewingathome.co.uk/product/midget-widget-world-universal-barrel-hose/


1

I have always used black tea stewed for about 30-45 min, and used as my about half of my brewing water, if you want to try with raisins have a look here: http://www.westchesterwinemakers.com/2013/05/31/x-18/


1

There is a one to one correspondence as the SRM is the absorption at 430 nm and one can calculate the density at 430 nm of a Lovibond series 52 glass. The series 52 glasses are 'made up' of Lovibond R and Y glasses and the only people who can tell you what the composition of a series 52 glass are the people at The Tintometer Ltd and they used to do this in a ...


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