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9

I imagine it depends upon the type of coloring - some food coloring can also work in liquids - just try dropping a few drops in a glass of water. With beer, you may need a lot of coloring for it to influence the beer color significantly. Depending upon the beer style, you can also color with fruit juices, but of course these will have some affect on the ...


7

Fruit is not the best color agent here - the flavor will be out of character in an Irish Red. You get the red color from a little roast barley. Take a handful of lightly crushed roasted barley (or two handfulls of whole) and let them stand in half a pint of cold water for half an hour to an hour. Strain the water, which will now be black, boil, then add it ...


6

Hibiscus contains hydroxycitric acid. I suspect it had a reaction to metal elements in the yeast nutrient. The product looks like iron chloride in solution to me.


6

Ordinary water-based food coloring works fine. I once made a green beer for St. Patrick's Day by brewing up a simple ale and then adding in yellow and blue food coloring after primary was over until it was green. I would stay away from food products initially, because some of them (like fruit) can influence the flavor as well. One thing to remember is that ...


6

Too soon. Don't sweat it. I bet it will lighten up as it ferments and yeast and trub drop.


5

The definition of SRM scale is based on the absorption of light at a single wavelength, so it's only measuring one aspect of color. The way the SRM views color is similar to how things look when you put them behind a yellow filter. Beer color is of course more than one-dimensional - reds, oranges, even some green, but these are not taken into account ...


5

I would go with some Sinamar. Its a product from Weyermann made entirely of Black Malt and will add color to the beer without any additional flavor. http://www.williamsbrewing.com/4-OZ-SINAMAR-NATURAL-BEER-COLORING-P2651.aspx Sinamar® natural beer coloring was patented by the Weyermann Company in Germany in 1902, and is a gluten free natural mashed ...


4

I've been brewing for 10+ years so the answer I give will be based upon experience. I have often seen beer to lighten in colour to some extent and have generally attributed this to the settling of sediments and proteins from the beer during the conditioning phase. With less sediment in suspension, light can more easily pass through the liquid, making it ...


3

My initial guess was the Campden tablet's SO2 was the culprit and hunting around for similar stories I found this on a home brew forum: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=267418 Observations in this thread would seem to fit with what you have experienced.


3

As far as my intuition goes, the color is just as I would expect. Might be a bit more red, but within my expectations all right. You used not-so-pale pale malts, and a bit of amber, so you couldn't have brown nor yellow. And addition of floor-malted malt might have caused more brownish and less reddish tint to your wort. For clarity, it's also not ...


3

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


2

I made a purple beer using purple corn. Try between 7 to 10 ears of corn per 5 gallon brew.


2

All those answers above used to be the way to go. Since then, Best Malz has introduced Red X malt. It gives you the reddest color I've ever seen, especially if you use it as 100% of your grist.


2

I think you've got 2 problems here: 1) The first is that the hop aroma disappeared almost immediately after opening the bottle..... I let the wort cool in an ice bath, and it took about 2 hours to cool. These two things are connected. When you add the Cascade hops right at the very end of the boil, their purpose was to impart some nice, American-...


2

As Tobias nicely put, there isn't much you can do about the colour. Although, I would not think too much about it having "much more of an amber color than most double IPA's I have seen". Unless you distinctly are looking for a specific colour, I would bother thinking about it. When it comes to the aroma I would suggest that you review your hop schedule; ...


2

There's not much you can do about the colour, aside from pick a different kit. The colour is a result of the mix of grains used to make the extract. To get more hop aroma, you could try dry hopping with couple ounces of a nice aroma hop like Cascade. After fermentation has completed, add two ounces of hops to the beer. Some brewers like to put the hops in ...


2

Particulates are dropping out. When they are in suspension, they make the wort appear lighter. As they drop out, the beer takes on its normal color.


2

You shouldn't scrub plastic - it will scratch it, which leaves small spaces for micro-organisms to grow, which are subsequently even harder to clean away. Instead, get a cleaner such as PBW or Oxiclean (I personally prefer PBW since it can be reused - Oxiclean loses potency once the oxygen has been released.) You can fill the pail with the made up PBW (4g/...


2

I have found that the colour of Hybiscus is pH sensitive. At low pH it is red and at higher pH it will turn purple.


2

To expand on my comment above: For most homebrewers, unless you're willing to drop some serious money on lab equipment, your measurements will be mostly limited to weights, volumes and specific gravity (and pressure, if kegging). Most of the numbers you'll be dealing with outside these things will involve calculations based on a best-fit equations for most ...


2

The volume to use is the final volume you are aiming for in the fermenter; yes the post boil volume. Lovibond -> SRM °L = (SRM + 0.76) ÷ 1.3546


1

I am guessing it’s the tartaric acid has an ion charge that holds it in suspension and that something about the ginger root was the flocculant that bound with it allowed it to drop out.


1

Your nutrient contained phosphate. Most phosphate compounds (besides phosphoric acid and ammonium phosphate) are insoluble. Part of what happened is the phosphate reacting chemically with other ions in the mead, causing the darkening effect which then settled out over time. So your update above makes perfect sense. David M. Taylor B.S. Chemical ...


1

Iodine based sanitizers may also stain your plastic equipment. My recommendation: Leave the bucket outside in the sun for a few hours, then smell the inside. if the inside has any aromas then you need to take the bucket back or get a new one. Cheers


1

I performed my first rack on some muscadine wine. I had 5 Camden tablets crushed and diluted in jug #2. Jug #1's content was deep pink. The content in the siphon line was pink. As soon as the wine touch the Camden/water solution in Jug #2, it turned a hazy gold color.


1

I was brewing a Pale Ale. When I was putting it in a carboy, it had red-brown color. After 3 weeks it became pale. So, it will become lighter with time. Just let your yeast do the job.


1

With the grain percentages you listed, I wouldn't be surprised if it's darker than 9 SRM. Adding 2-4% roasted malt is a common technique for giving Red Ales their deep red hue. Color is also notoriously difficult to predict accurately and can vary depending on caramelization in the boil, the batch of malt, tannin extraction during sparging, and even hops. ...


1

Did you consider the size difference of the container(s) the pictured? Homebrew will appear lighter in a smaller container and darker if shown in a large container. For example, a 3 gallon carboy and a 10 gallon carboy will look completely different even when they're filled with the same liquid.


1

If there is yeast in suspension, then filtering out the yeast will make the beer color appear darker. When you add yeast, (e.g. when making a starter) the color becomes progressively lighter - the yeast cells make the beer more reflective. When you remove the yeast cells, the beer becomes less reflective, and darker. The beer will also become clearer, ...


1

There is a one to one correspondence as the SRM is the absorption at 430 nm and one can calculate the density at 430 nm of a Lovibond series 52 glass. The series 52 glasses are 'made up' of Lovibond R and Y glasses and the only people who can tell you what the composition of a series 52 glass are the people at The Tintometer Ltd and they used to do this in a ...


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