9 votes

Cold Crashing techniques

I give fermentation 4-5 days at 63°F, then bump up the temp to 70-72°F for maybe another 3 days. Then I crash to 33°F for 3-5 days until the beer clears.
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7 votes

Cold Crashing techniques

I am not sure exactly what you are defining as efficient, so I am going to answer this assuming time efficiency is your primary goal. Denny's advice is good advice for a general approach without ...
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Long cold crash for an ale. Benefit or harm?

What you're doing is lagering the beer, so it would have the same benefits it has for a lager beer. Beer deteriorates much more slowly at cold temperatures. The only possible problem I know of is ...
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Fermentation not over?Cold crash or not?

It looks like the fermentation is complete, as the specific gravity has essentially stabilized. However, I'd leave it at 20C for another week at least to let the yeast clean up before cold-crashing. ...
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Can I cold crash if I'll be bottle-conditioning?

Once you have cold crashed there will still be enough yeast to carb up your beer, given enough time. I suggest leaving your beers in primary for your usual amount of time, but racking to secondary ...
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cold crashing question

I cold crash (and fine with gelatin) at 30F for two or three days before kegging. I have found that 30F for two days clears my beer better than weeks at 38F in my refrigerator. If you plan to bottle ...
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4 votes

Long cold crash for an ale. Benefit or harm?

I routinely do this. Namely because of time constraints as well. My normal brewing process involves brewing once a month. So when brewing the next batch I am tending to the previous batch which was ...
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4 votes

cold crash bottled ale

Sure, that's a good idea. Give it a week or 2 cold and it should clear up.
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4 votes

How long should I maintain cold crash temperature for Witbier?

To really answer your question, a couple of days more or less will not make a difference. Actually, you shouldn't cold crash witbier. It is also bottled with its yeast. At serving time, you then make ...
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3 votes

Cold crashing bottled ale after fermentation

Yes, you have it. Normally you cold crash at the end of fermentation, before bottling. And a word of warning...if it was still outgassing heavily when you bottled it, it's likely fermentation wasn't ...
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Cold Crashing Mead. Need help with details

Most of the time mead makers don't cold crash. Just let it sit and it will clear over time. If you want to speed it along look into wine fining agents.
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3 votes

How long should I maintain cold crash temperature for Witbier?

Yes, you can keep the temperature for several days, no problem. The only problem that can cause you is to clarify too much and lose the turbidity that witbier needs. Glad to be able to help!
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2 votes

cold crash bottled ale

The beer will clear with age, but will clear more quickly in cold conditions.
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Neglected to Cold Crash after fermentation

If you put your bottled beer in the refrigerator and let it sit, it usually will be crystal clear within a few weeks, even if it starts out with chill haze. I think the only difference between cold ...
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Cold crashing and risk of oxidation

This is a valid way to do it. There will be a slight amount of air and therefore oxygen sucked in, but not enough that I would worry about it.
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Would an extended time cold crash at 10°C work or not?

It won't hurt anything for sure. It will work about how you'd expect, actually, your beer will clear up quicker than at room temperature but not as fast as if you could get it down to 35 F or wherever ...
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2 votes

Cold crash with airlock or not

There's no need for an airlock. By the time you get to cold crashing, fermentation is done so the need for an airlock is gone. I seal the fermenter using a solid stopper before cold crashing.
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2 votes

Sanitizer sucked back into beer, dangerous?

I use gin as it is fine to drink if you accidentally suck it back through the airlock.
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2 votes

"Debugging" a bitter DDH NEIPA

Less bitterness - I would drop some of the interim hop additions, I would stick with the FWH just to reduce foaming, and I would eliminate the 40min 0.2oz and 20 min 0.45 oz additions. If you want ...
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2 votes

Can I cold crash if I'll be bottle-conditioning?

You don't really need to rack to secondary. Just cold crash in your primary fermenter, and then be very careful not to suck up any yeast from the bottom when you transfer to your bottling bucket. The ...
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2 votes

How can you force flocculation of weizen yeast?

I brewed something like this a couple of months ago. Wait until first fermentation has calmed down (not stopped), then rack to secondary and add some sugar to make fermentation go one, depending on ...
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2 votes

Bringing Cold Crashed Beer to Room Temperature

Regarding your question about yeast viability - it probably depends a little bit on how long you had the beer stored in the fridge, and how cold you stored it. Assuming you only had it stored for a ...
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Cold crashing and priming for carbonation, does that work?

There are two steps needed here: Ensure complete fermentation Reduce the amount of yeast in suspension. If you are concerned that the fermentation is not complete, you could raise the temperature of ...
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Does cold crashing have a negative impact?

I send an email to John Palmer, he has been kind enough to answer. I guess it is ok to post it here, so here it is: Hi, It's best practice. Lots of breweries cold crash, and they lose head retention ...
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2 votes

Taste diacetyl in my first Pilsner :(

Looks just like a little bit rushed for the total schedule. It wouldn't have hurt the beer any to let it finish out at the warmer temp of 60F. Instead your data shows you started to chill it back ...
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1 vote

Does cold crashing have a negative impact?

I have never noticed a problem with cold crashing. In reality, it takes a while for the temperature to drop anyway (albeit not 1*C per day). If you are hoping to harvest the yeast, shocking them ...
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1 vote

How long does clarification take given a refrigerator temperature level cold crash?

Since this question involves estimation and I haven't actually run the proposed experiment myself or recorded specific data, I'll take my guess based on what I think I might know based on 20 years ...
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1 vote

How long does clarification take given a refrigerator temperature level cold crash?

For cold crashing we go from tank temp to 4C in about a day, that is due to the limitations of our cooling plates and chillers. If we could drop a tank from 18-20C to 1C in 12H I would take that. ~1....
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Cold crashing kombucha

In my personal experience, cold crashing does help to clear the booch a bit. I'm a homebrewer who has started to brew kombucha. I've only got 4 kombucha brews under my belt and I've been kegging ...
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1 vote

Cold crashing kombucha

Some info about Cold Crashing. Cold crashing will definitely help that problem of cloudiness and yeast sediments on the bottom. I recommend 10 days at as close to 0 celsius as you can. e.g. 1 degree ...
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