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It's impossible to look at a beers ingredient list and derive an exact recipe from it. You have to go through a process of trial and error, using any information you can get from the manufacturer combined with experience or intuition. However, the good news is that you probably won't have to do that yourself, because its highly likely someone else already ...


3

You want to preserve the ratio of 2-row to Crystal 60L. Here is one simplified way to do the math. 2-Row has an average, theoretical extract yield of 1.036 specific gravity -- if you take the last two digits (36), you can express this as 36 gravity points per pound of grain per gallon of wort (PPG) at 100% efficiency. The recipe assumes a mash ...


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This will give you the IBU and ABV you are looking for. To get the mouth feel you will have to play around with mash-in temps to try get the right proportions of un-fermentable sugars out. 4.5 kg 10lb Pale 2-Row (UK) Any Mash 38 2 °L 0.45 kg 1lb Chocolate (US) Any Mash 29 350 °L 0.45 kg 1lb Caramel/Crystal 60L (...


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Clone recipe posted here don't know how legal it was for them to post, and how legal for me would be to re-post here. Manufacturer's site gives you ingredients: pilsner malt, German lager yeast, German Perle hops It also gives you parameters to target, for use with software like BrewTarget: ABV 8.0% IBU 25 Color 8 SRM BYO recipe follows these pretty ...


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In short yes, it helps With a SG reading from a hydrometer and a refractometer you can get the OG within 0.001 or so and obviously the FG, both are very useful in replicating an unknown recipe. Knowing the OG is very important and makes guessing the grain bill that much easier. Also having an accurate SRM helps a lot with calculating the specialty malts. ...


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Obviously one place to look for any hints and tips are the various brew fora and recipe lists. Most commercial beers have a "guessed" list going on somewhere. The SG of the bottled beer (in most large scale commercial brewery examples) is practically the same as the FG of the brew. Filtering usually removes the yeast and effectively stops further ...


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Mostly everything there looks good. Exception is the use of maltodextrin which is non-fermentable. So it will increase the OG and FG but not the ABV resulting in a beer that may be too sweet and unbalanced. Also steeping cara malts will also be mostly unfermentable sugars adding to the high FG. Yes carapils and carafoam are about the same, just different ...


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Let it go the full 6 weeks. A little aging always improves the flavor unless you want hoppy hoppy hoppy IPA's.


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Short answer: No. There is no way to just look at a list of ingredients, with no quantities, and with great accuracy know how the beer is made, or what those quantities are. The best you can do is take educated guesses based on things like hoppyness, maltyness, sweetness, color, clarity and smell of the beer. But, there is hope, as beer recipes are very ...


1

Be sure to measure at 20°C, or whatever temperature your device is designed for. If you are using refractometer, you are going to need some fancy calculations I can't help you with. If you're using hydrometer, make sure it shows 0 in pure water, and shake your sample before measuring,to get rid of CO2 . Bottle conditioning may change a bit, but if you are ...


1

As the other answers say, you can go off the experience of others and use trial and error to dial in a recipe. I agree with them, but I also highly recommend Ray Daniel's "Designing Great Beers" for advice on how to go about formulating your own recipes. Since buying this book in 1998, I have only followed other people's recipes a few times.


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From the ingredients found on beeradvocate I tossed them in BrewR to get the numbers close. This should be a good start to a clone recipe. Widmir Brrr Batch size: 12.0 gal Boil volume: 13.5 gal OG: 1.072 FG: 1.018 Bitterness (IBU): 51.2 Color (SRM): 16.9 ABV: 7.0% Grain/Sugars: 15.00 lb Two-row (US), 44.8% 15.00 lb Munich (German), 44.8% 1.00 lb ...


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I'm sure you can find a good base recipe from the other answers, here's some suggestions for your modifications. More Malt consider a small Melonoiden Malt addition for Maillard notes (biscuit, bread crust, carmel) More Body Body is mainly controlled by mash temperatures. Specifically the higher end of alpha-amylase temps for fuller body beers.


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Apparently, this recipe came from the original authors of the beer you are cloning: Fat Tire Clone (December): 5 gal, OG = 1.050, FG = 1.013 IBU = 19, SRM = 14, ABV = 4.7% 8# 10 oz. 2-row Pale Malt 1# Munich Malt 8 oz. Crystal Malt (80L) 6 oz. Victory Malt 0.4 oz. Target (60 min.) 0.5 oz. Willamette (10 min.) 0.5 oz. Goldings ...


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Zymurgy magazine has recipes for the the Amber and the Belgian. Jul/Aug 2006 New Belgium Fat Tire Clone Jul/Aug 2003 Fat Tire Amber Ale Clone You have to be a member to access the recipes. Here is a lot of clone recipes: Beersmith Recipes Look at the recipes and determine what you think is a good median. Brew that. Taste and decide where that lands to what ...


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Since "Leffe Brune" is one of my favorite beer. I have tried to clone it for a while. I have now created a recipe that is incredibly similar. I can not distinguish between the beer in a test. Smoked malt gives the taste of pine tar, and that use of Safbrew T-58 provides a high FG, allowing that the sweetness remains. All malts are from Weyermann. ...


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Pelforth Brune is a great beer...I've been after a recipe for a long time. This is what I've found out about Pelforth. Pelforth is a Bock, which is closer to lager than ale. Pelforth, was first brewed in 1935 using two different types of malt and English yeast Alcohol Content 6.5 % Bitterness 21. EBU Colour 70.0 EBC It takes 43kg per hectoliter, that's ...


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