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4

I never use nutrient in my ciders and they turn out great. You don’t need a hydrometer either. It can be useful but is not essential. Cidermaking can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be. There is no wrong way to do it. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Cheers.


3

Bakers yeast has been selected to ferment quickly, as the faster it ferments available sugars the faster the dough rises and the sooner you can bake your bread. Whereas, beer and cider yeasts have been selected for flavour profile, and not rate of fermentation. I have in the past brewed with Bakers yeast and if you keep the temps reasonable it can be OK, but ...


3

The human senses are actually very fine tuned to alert you to the presence of bacteria and mold and prevent botulism (though I think you probably understand this implicitly and just want an authoritative answer). Firstly, look at your brew. Infection will typically manifest as black spots or a layer of pellicle on the top of the drink. Second, smell it -- ...


2

You don't need to add any nutrients. I don't use nutrients in any of my ciders and they turn out fantastic. I wouldn't add Vitamin C either. Or even cane sugar, unless you want to make a very strong wine-like product. No additions are needed, just the juice and yeast are all you really need. If you want to add some wild character from grape skins or ...


2

No. You didn't kill your cider, this description sounds like a perfectly normal fermentation. Generally a yeast fermentation is vigorous in the first 1~7 days (typically producing a krausen), this phase is known by the term "primary fermentation". The time taken can be significantly different depending on temperature, sugar-concentration, amount of yeast, ...


2

This looks normal. Tartness is normal. Soon it should begin to clear, maybe another couple of weeks. Be aware however that every time you open the lid and look at it like this, your are inviting wild bacteria and yeast including the acetobacter which causes vinegar to enter into the cider to sour and/or funkify it. My advice is to cool it down, into the ...


2

In my experience, I usually don't begin to see CO2 bubbles until days 3 or 4. Usually by the end of a week you should have pretty aggressive fermentation. I usually keep my Cider fermenting on a temperature that is the lowest that the yeast supports on the packet as I find that the fermentation is "cleaner" and I believe yeast will produce more &...


2

Welcome to the hobby! Excess head space is not a problem for at least the first 2-3 weeks of fermentation. If you will keep it fermenting for much longer than that, you may want to rack it over to a new container with a smaller surface area at top, like a carboy where the neck is constricted. But even if you don't, if you will be consuming the cider ...


1

should I transfer this stuff into some growlers to age and for how long? I would advise against storing anything in growlers for the purpose of aging. They're too oxygen permeable and you have no good way to test out a small bit of the batch without opening and affecting a whole growler. However, cider gets better with age, and you should age it about as ...


1

I have used the same wort calculators on ciders with some success. True the ingredients are different, but the correction curves should be similar. Personally for beer-wort I use a correction factor of 0.99 for my refractometer, and 1.04 for cider... but your mileage may vary. You might even find the opposite is true for your refractometer. Each gauge ...


1

What I learned is this: After pressing the juice, add 0.04g/l metabisulfite to the juice to inhibit wild yeasts Add the pectinase Pectinase works best at room temperature, and the juice should rest for 12 to 24 hours After that, add the yeast. I use the pectinase because I only have small quantities of juice and pasteurise and bottle them. It works, ...


1

First of all you start with pressed apple juice (Cider is the final product). You really need to know what you are putting in the pressed apple juice from the 'kit' to work out what is going on. can you provide a link to the kit that you are using? Isn't one of the points of homebrewing to make something you know EXACTLY what is in there? Most of the pectin ...


1

When will it be ready! LOL. I know this is an obvious question but despite some googling and YouTubing I’m still not entirely clear of this. I am assuming the lack of bubbles is due to the excessive headspace? If this is so, will I be lacking an important indication of the fermentation taking place? Well, that depends on what you really consider "ready&...


1

Yes, if you are using wine yeast it is common for a ferment to finish in a week. I've had commercial sized batches of grapes (multiple tons) finish in 7 days depending on how hot it is and the type of yeast. The sulfur smell may or may not dissipate with time. I would rack off the yeast soon as that can sometimes contribute to hydrogen sulfide production.


1

I would, perhaps ignoring some of the limitations you've posted - fermented it for a longer period (primary fermentation). Cider needs both fermentation and conditioning. I would also make a new functioning air lock as that is the crux regardless, a simple hack would then be a blow-off tube (a tightly sealed tube where the other end is submerged). If you ...


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