Hot answers tagged

18

Don't use hot water to clean glass carboys. The glass is subject to thermal shock when some of it is heated while the rest remains cool. Count yourself lucky that you escaped without injury.


15

Northern Brewer/Midwest has come under a lot of pressure as of lately regarding their glass Big Mouth Bubbler product line. They've confirmed that they are curating their reviews that are submitted to the site. If they are negative, they claim to contact the reviewer personally to resolve their complaints and remove the negative review. If you do a search ...


12

Do not carry a full carboy only by the neck. All of that weight is concentrated in the small area of that carrier, exerting a lot more force than the neck was designed for. It may not happen often, but the risk isn't worth the reward, in my opinion, especially when there are much better options to moving full carboys. Some folks like to use milk crates. I ...


11

Stirring is not needed while the yeast are actively fermenting because the fermenting wort is naturally turbulent - i.e. it self-stirs. This churning mixes the wort ensuring the yeast are suspended more-or-less throughout the wort, so they are always in contact with their food supply, making additional stirring redundant. The turbulence in the wort comes ...


9

TAKE THE STOPPER OUT! THIS IS A SERIOUS ACCIDENT WAITING TO HAPPEN! Unlike glass bottles, glass carboys are not designed to hold pressure. 4 tsp in 1 gallon will produce about about 2.4 volumes of CO2. The pressure created will be significant - at a minimum 22 PSI, but likely more than that, since fermentation proceeds quicker than the CO2 will dissolve, ...


9

I use the better bottle PET carboys for my lagers, and have noticed no oxidization. The amount of oxygen introduced through the carboy itself is negligible compared to the amount introduced through the stopper or when racking to the bottling bucket or transferring to keg. The Better Bottle page discussing permeability aims to show that plastic is fine for ...


8

I'd try making a collar for your freezer lid to raise it and make room for your fermenter. Far easier and more realistic than trying to build a fermenter.


8

The best way to get the turkey baster out with the least consequences on your wort is to wait until the beer is finished fermenting, and then just dump it out after the beer has been racked away. Whatever contamination was going to happen has already happened (hopefully you sanitized the turkey baster). Trying to fish out the turkey baster is going to be ...


7

I use the handle as a steadying tool and something solid to hold on to when it's slick from water and cleaner. I support the weight of the carboy from the bottom with my other hand while holding onto the handle. I really wouldn't recommend carrying a carboy simply by a handle on the neck unless it's totally empty, and maybe not even then. Yes, it is ...


7

Duct tape....I've done it more than once.


7

You do not want to do this. Carboys are not meant to hold pressure and will break. If you want clearer beer, aging it longer in a carboy and/or using something like gelatin or whirlfloc will greatly aid in clarity.


6

Warmer temperatures will allow the yeast to continue its work, cleaning up the beer. Colder temperatures will promote yeast flocculation which helps to clear the beer. It'd suggest leaving the beer in the fermentation temperature range for a week or two after the final gravity has been reached, and then moving it to the cooler basement to help it clear.


6

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time. You should not worry as you are not setting it down for it to pick up bacterial contamination. Yes there is a tiny ...


5

For something north of electrical tape and south of glass-etching, I've used nail polish. Cheap and easy; even comes with it's own little brush. It won't come off in most circumstances, but it will if you take some acetone to it.


5

I would advise trying to siphon first. You can use one siphon on multiple carboys. This is a much more economical option to making or converting multiple glass secondary fermenters to have a spigot. Of course, thus assumes that you have more than one brew going at once. As you're new, this is mere conjecture. However, if you plan on being both wine and beer,...


5

Yeah, it pretty much is a constant risk. I broke 3 before I stopped using glass, one of them by just setting it carefully on a carpeted floor. I finally switched over to buckets and wonder why I didn't do it sooner. I've brewed over 400 batches using bucket fermenters and I have yet to find a down side.


5

For the benefit you'd gain from leaving your hydro in there (maybe saving some volume as you won't take samples) I think it wouldn't really be worth your time as I imagine it would be pretty difficult to read without having to clean it off. Also having to open up your fermentor each time to take a reading exposes the wort to possible infection. I usually ...


5

The biggest issue in doing that is that krausen will get stuck to both your hydrometer and your carboy walls. Even if you wait for the krausen to die off before dumping your hydrometer in, you will still have a bit of a hard time reading it through the krausened carboy walls... But hey, go ahead and try! That is the essence of homebrewing.


5

At the 1 week stage: do not worry. If it's still there in a few weeks, sure, worry then. All sorts of weird flavours come off yeast when it's actively fermenting. For example lager yeasts can just smell plain rotten (eggs, sulphur, ick!), but afterwards you get beautiful clean beer. Forget about it for a week (or even 2), and start planning your next ...


5

This is a completely normal blow-off fermentation in a carboy. The krausen (in any ferment) will eventually subside and fall into the beer. As the krausen was pushed into the neck and walls of the carboy, some of it stuck to the sides. You don't need to transfer it. It generally won't fall off on its own, and you'll need to clean it off/out once you've ...


5

It usually happens with strong fermentation when the krausen clogs the airlock, it is then ejected with the pressure. If the fermentation was still active when you returned, the beer might not be contaminated due to gas escaping the container. What makes you think it is contaminated? Is there anything unusual floating on the surface? You can always add ...


4

If you have the time (ie, don't otherwise need/want to use the bucket), you can easily leave it until it's finished fermenting; a carboy is not strictly necessary. The biggest differences between bucket and (glass) carboy is oxygen permeability for long-term storage and the ability to clean, especially with "bugs": souring yeast/bacteria cultures. If you'...


4

I came across this just today: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f19/carboy-vs-thumb-334851/ I've seen more than one story like this. I will never carry a full carboy by a handle on the neck; milk crates or straps.


4

The problem with using anything that etches is that you're removing material from the unit. This can in turn affect the structural integrity in the long run. This is somewhat counter to why people prefer glass fermenters; they will resist scratching better than plastic. Etching is essentially controlled scratching. A few years ago I took a bumper sticker ...


4

Well, here's my list of why it's a bad idea.... You will weaken the carboy and increase the risk of it breaking. You need to be able to keep the spigot sanitized throughout fermentation. Have you priced having custom carboys made? It's just unnecessary...siphoning isn't that hard to do. What you're looking at is dangerous, expensive and ...


4

I think that any rapid change in temperature can explode glass. The same can happen to a drinking glass that you pull out of a hot dishwasher then add cold beer. It can crack and possibly explode. I am not saying that all glass does this but in some cases it can.


4

No, you don't need to worry about contamination based on what you describe.


4

Yeah, it may. If you can chill the before racking to a keg it should drop the hops. If you can' do that, you can just wait til they drop on their own.


4

I'm not a fan of using bags in fermentation The bags usually float giving a perfect media for bacteria on the exposed area to grow on. Expecially in secondary when c02 levels are the lowest. Also in a carboy it's very difficult to remove. As far as floating particles You won't have any issues by adding loose pellets, if you could crash the secondary and ...


4

Few tricks for temporary fix. Swirling every so often can get kausen to drop back in. Nitrile glove with a pin hole in a finger will work for a DYI air relief cover, should limit the mess. Latex will work too but not recommended due to their odor.


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