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7

Give it a try-- fill a bottle with water, put a cap on, flip it upside down, and see if any water drips out. If the cap makes a watertight seal, then the next time you're bottling fill a couple and see how they work out.


6

I never considered reusing caps, in my opinion, they probably have suffered some sort of flaw in their ability to reseal a bottle and be able to retain pressure. If you want to try a few caps after an inspection have at it. Be sure to sanitize well before their use. Considering their low cost it may not be worth the risk of losing a bottle of beer.


6

There's a UK company starting up that says they're going to do this. They haven't started yet so i can't speak for their quality but probably worth a look because at the very least it would save you on shipping. They're called Your Brew (www.YourBrew.co.uk). They had an offer on to sign up for free samples when they finally open (which i signed up for) but ...


6

My capper does this too. It's not been an issue for our beer. If it was leaking I'd think you might see some evidence around the top.


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


4

Are the bottles that you are using screw tops? That might be the problem. Although some people have had success, others complained about leaks How are you capping? Maybe you are causing damage by using too much force. Test: place a balloon or condom over a bottle. If the item inflates, you have a leak. if it does not, open the bottle (after 2 weeks to ...


3

It hard to diagnose this without pictures, numbers, etc... Maybe you overprimed, maybe you didn't. Over priming with good caps = beer volcanos. And explosions. And a big mess. So maybe there is something wrong with your caps, bottles, or capper. Leaky caps should have held some gas, giving you random levels of carbonation. The only time I ever had a miss-...


1

Many caps are made with an oxygen absorbing layer to prevent the beer from oxidizing. The benefit of such layers is disputed, however they are definitely not functioning anymore when being used a second time.


1

Being involved with the AHA and having judged national finals several times, I can tell you there are 2 concerns...first, there should be nothing on the bottle to identify it came from you. That's not too difficult. But with the number of entries we get these days, storage is a concern. The reason you should use standard 12 oz. bottles and caps is so that ...


1

Yes you can! Just make sure that he threads and inner seal of each cap is good before you sanitize them and pop them onto your brand new fresh brew! A good thing to watch out for is overtightening just like simone above mentioned, the pressure bulges the cap up and can compromise the airtight and beer tight seal.


1

You say the caps were "firmly on". No offense, but if they're leaking the caps weren't fully sealed. Possible culprits could be the bottles or caps you use, your capper, or your technique. we need to know more about what you do and how you do it to narrow that list down.


1

It sounds like you're not getting a good seal on the caps. Do you notice carb loss over time? Do they leak when you simply tip them upside down? If so, it could be any number of things: the capper, your technique or the bottle itself (e.g. twist off rather than pry-off).


1

Were you using plastic pet bottles? If you use soda bottles some of them have a blue plastic seal under the cap which acts like a washer when you screw the cap down. If the cap is old the plastic seal may not be effective. Another option is that some plastic bottles do not use the blue plastic seal so you have to be careful as the what bottles go with ...


1

I don't think there's a single easy solution to your issue with hand cappers, you may need to keep the two types around to cover as many as possible. The Bench Capper would work fine for you, just sort the bottles by height and that way when it comes to capping you won't need to change the height as frequently. There's not really a clear cap interface ...


1

i was also looking for a company that printed bottle tops in the uk and tried www.YourBrew.co.uk ,, I was very very impressed and now use them for all my requirements.


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