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Cold alone is not really an option, since yeast will not die but become dormant, and could be reactivated after heating a little. There are a few ways to acheive this: Pasteurization This will kill the yeast, but heating could affect the final product in some cases. Filtration A very fine filter can remove yeast particles. Sweeteners/Less sugar Adding ...


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Only do this before bottling. From all over the forums, and from high profile homebrew people, it seems that keeping your beer for up to four (or even six weeks) in the fermentation bucket is really no problem. I sometimes move my fermenting beer to a second vessel, in two cases: When I want my beer more clear, somehow this helps When I open ferment, when ...


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Chlorine can only really come from your water or your cleaning process. Make sure you get filtered water or use a campden tablet in your water to get rid of chlorine before you brew. How are you cleaning your equipment? You should only be using chemicals like PBW and Starsan to clean and sanitize everything. Are you absolutely sure it's chlorine? You might ...


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There is this homebrew question which already has some good answers. The first thing to look at is your brewing water, and your cleaning and sanitizing solutions. If your brewing water is not highly chlorinated, and you are not using any cleaners solutions that would impart this flavor you may be getting phenolic off flavors as a result of an infection. Your ...


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FWIW, you should realize that the CO2 you are degassing does not come from the blanket of CO2 in the fermentor. Its CO2 that dissolved into the wine during fermentation. I find the vacuum idea a cool way to degas though. In the future, I think your process needs to stay the same for using CO2 to keep the headspace free from O2. As for keeping it under ...


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If the gravity is indeed stable, I think @phillippe's answer is good, logical advice and would be wise to follow. On the other hand, if this is a 5gal(19L) all grain batch with ~10lbs of fermentable grain, I don't think your SG could be much over 1.050. This is of course an assumption, based on ~10 pounds of grain and average efficiency. That means you've ...


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In general, you can consider you fermentation completed when you get the same gravity reading for 3 days in a row. It is either completed or stuck (I won't go on the details here, but do a search on 'stuck fermentation' if you like). In your case, 1.028 seems low enough to be considered finished. You can go ahead and bottle, however, I would recommend ...


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It should be fine, I would think, since it's the yeast that does the carbing in bottle conditioning. Yeast is stored in the fridge routinely before it's woken up, I just wouldn't want to give it any sudden temp changes. Might take a little longer to get it where you want it. I routinely experience continued fermentation in beers that I keg & put in the ...


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Yes, in my experience, there is still enough active yeast present for about 8 weeks. Beyond that point then I would add just 1-2 grams of fresh yeast. But you're not there yet so I'm sure it will turn out fine with no additional yeast.


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I have used these too. While it does look messy, it definitely works. Since there are holes over three different heights, you could try to put the band a bit lower, so that it is underneath the lower enlargement of the glass. Otherwise it looks neat. Did you use a pliers? Because the first time I used them, it was a bloody (literally) mess, my fingers were ...


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This should be safe to bottle. You used an awful lot of nutrient. I can see that it helped, but you probably only needed about one teaspoon maximum; the rest of it was truly not useful. As such you saw the initial drop from 1.016 to 1.012, and that is as far as it will go. You can prime and bottle the batch now as normal. It should turn out well. You ...


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If beer is "perfectly carbonated beer", then transferring it isn't a problem. What happen with "warm" beer is that it doesn't retain/absorb gas as a cold liquid. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ideal_gas_law Putting a keg at room temperature and purge it few time will lower the CO2 volume in liquid. Using it cold with pressure will add CO2 volume. If ...


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You should always be worried about bottle bombs (or at the very least, over-carbed beer) if you cant assert that fermentation is complete before you bottle. Buy a hydrometer and use it to assert that fermentation is complete (specific gravity reading stable for 3 days) before bottling. It removes guesswork from the process and thus anxiety from wondering ...


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Eh up Ben, I've been brewing for 25 yrs and i still worry about bottle bombs. but lets put this in perspective, if fermentation is complete- IE no change in sg for a couple of days and you don't over prime all should be well. All my bottles are stored in a cardboard box with packing, losing the beer is not the issue with me its not having to clean up a big ...


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If your hydrometer is not reading correctly then yes this could be the issue. In tap water at 20 or 25 depending on calibration it should read 1000+/-0.5. If it is reading 1006 then it is a fair way off. Applying a correection factor of 1021 = 0006 => 1015 which is pretty close to your target of 1014. I I strongly suggest you get a new hydrometer. I would ...


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Absolutely. Add a maximum of 1/2 teaspoon of sugar per 12-ounce bottle, or 1 teaspoon per 22-ounce bomber, etc. Then allow another "final" fermentation within the sealed bottles for another week or two. After the first batch you can adjust the amounts of sugar to suit your desired level of carbonation. And you can also substitute honey or a ...


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Commonly in wine and apple cider production, potassium sorbate and sodium metabisulfite are used to control yeast (and bacteria). The potassium sorbate stops the yeast from multiplying, while the sodium metabisulfite kills (most of) the yeast.


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