6

The strategy for getting the most wort into the fermenter is to dump it all in. Everything, hops and everything. I don't scrape the stickies off the wall of the pot, but I tip the whole thing into the fermenter. I generally aim for none wort to be left in the pot. It will make good beer. If you're not comfortable with that, the strainer idea is fantastic ...


5

Although we need more information to be more specific, the general answer to "how much wort should be left behind" is "as little as possible". One thing you can do is pour the wort through a sanitized strainer and press the hops with a sanitized spoon to extract the wort in them. Also, once the wort is cooled down, you can simply pour it through a strainer ...


5

The boil is important for achieving certain beneficial changes in the chemistry of the wort that include the dropping out of haze creating proteins. So don’t forego the boil, even if it’s only a 6-liter partial boil. The main issue with boiling a small quantity of wort is that you'll get caramelization a lot sooner than if you were to boil the extract in a ...


4

Electro-etching works with all metals, including Aluminum. Often, the makeup of the electrolyte is changed up to give better or worse results with different metals. In this case, you don't actually need an acid as per the above - just a salt water solution works fine for aluminum. However, please make sure to do this in a well ventilated area as electro-...


4

You can always add one later. I have them on all my kettles and they're helpful, but not a necessity for basic brewing. I'd say the biggest thing mine do for me is allow me to use a pump for recirculated chilling. But you can always go on stages, adding a valve (the weldless kits work great) and pump, etc. as need and finances dictate.


4

I regularly do 10gl batches in a 15.5gl keggle. You will definitely need to attend to the kettle while bringing it up to a boil to prevent boil-overs, but it's certainly possible. Also, foam-control agents (Fermcap-S, simethicone/baby gas drops) will help, but are not fool-proof prevention. One thing to note: you need a lot fewer BTUs to maintain a boil (...


3

Another easy solution is to use a muslin bag during your boil. Homebrew shops sells them in bulk for under a dollar each. They are like pantyhose and stretch a lot. Stick it in your kettle and clip/tie an end of the bag to either handle. You'll have the bag stretched across the middle of the kettle with the top of the bag open. Whenever you make hop ...


3

I would recommend NOT boiling the malt extract. There is absolutely no point in doing so. The extract is already sterile and at best only needs pasteurisation which can be done by dissolving the extract in several litres of near boiling water in the fermentation vessel when making up the wort. The flavour comes in the main from the steeped grain and hops and ...


3

Losses of water in the brewing process are common. There are some that are unavoidable and some that are controllable to a point. 1. Absorption by Grain: Your dry grain will absorb water at a rate of 0.96*(weight of grain). The 0.96 is a ratio, so if you use kg of grain, for every 1 kg of grain, you will lose 0.96 kg of water (~960 mL). If you use pounds, 1 ...


3

The main advantage with SS is that it is quite inert - had you had a stainless kettle, the corrosion problem you experienced with the immersion chiller wouldn't have happened. Since it's happened once, it's quite likely to happen again, meaning you'd end up buying 2 new aluminum kettles (for a total of 3.) So in the long run stainless will work out cheaper....


3

That seems low, but it's largely dependent on what's in the kit. It is probably an extract kit. If it's not completely extract and includes some specialty grains you may be in trouble. Depending on weight these will require some steeping and require about 1.25 quarts of water per pound of grains, and don't forget to leave room for the grains in the pot as ...


3

It's a can of metal. If you don't feel you can get the surface clean after the fry (perhaps because of carbonization of organic matter stuck to the surface), then that will be a problem. If you can, then it's a clean surface you will have no problems brewing with in the future. I'd say: roast away! If there's a problem, lobby to get your family to replace ...


3

There are two stages you are "loosing" water, and each have different mechanism: Mash and sparge Boil Let's talk them one at a time. Mash & Sparge loses There are two reasons for that. First is stuck filtering. If your malt is dripping wet, but nothing comes from the filter, this is the case. See Preventing a Stuck Sparge for details how to deal with ...


3

Many people use propane turkey fryer setups, consisting of a large propane burner and kettle. The kettle is usually around 6.5-7 gal. so it's barely big enough for a 5 gal. batch, but it works. I won awards for beer made with one. The kettles are often AL, but don't let that throw you. It's perfectly fine and safe.


3

As far as I can see it would not matter if the threads were exposed, or if you had teflon tape (as long as it does not give of anything that can damage the beer) when it comes to sanitary issues since you, hopefully, clean your equipment before using it. Since this part will also be inside the brew it will be in a boiling liquid for an hour or two. If you ...


2

I would be concerned about their durability. They are likely not stainless steel under the finish so any exposed metal will rust. If you are planning on drilling holes for spigots, sight glasses, etc., that will definitely be a problem. Also, mash tuns and boils kettles take a beating with exposure to somewhat acidic wort and harsh cleaners. I assume you ...


2

I would not count on those being food grade. I recommend you look into 55 gal. SS barrels.


2

The problem might be a thermocouple this is a hardwired switch that will cut the element out if the temp goes to high. this is a additional safety and is normally wired in series with the thermostat that normally switches of the element when it gets to the set temperature. this switch might be faulty, your local electrician might be able to fix it or maybe ...


2

I think it will be too small. The ROT is that you want a pot at least 50% bigger than your batch size.


2

I think the cleaning you gave it will be good. But if not, then at most your first beer might have a flat head from fatty deposits that will be removed by the acidic wort on your first brew. So definitely use it, you'll be fine in the long run.


2

I have two very rough guesses. First, are there any points where you are boiling uncovered where you could change and cover the pot? Second, your boiler is 52l? Given how large that is I expect you're producing a lot of steam in the boiler due to its increased surface area. Try skipping the boiler, sparge back into your HLT instead of the boiler. Having ...


1

Most of the extract recipes I've brewed have been 'half-boil' recipes where approximately a third of the LME is added to the steeping liquid plus a few (4-5) extra litres of water for the boil. Boil then proceeds according to recipe, but less volume. The rest of the extract is then added when increasing volume and dropping temp ready for pitching. Overall, ...


1

Ok here's what you want to do. Do the steep as instructed. When you remove the grains just before 170°F, sqeeze the bag the best you can to get as much wort as possible, silicone bbq mits help. Now at 1.75 gallons after grain absorption Then top off to your kettle capacity with water, add DME, mix well and continue with boil without a lid on. Now at 4 ...


1

I am not an expert, but I am also a BIABer and a I work with a small kettle (about 19 liters). So I am always trying to retrieve as much wort as I can with the limitations of my equipment. Something that I recently learn adapting recipes to my equipment, is that yes is possible to make a more concentrate wort that fits size of my/your kettle, and after that ...


1

The bottom lime is that you're nor going to get a lot of hop aroma out of a 5 minute addition, or even at flameout. I've pretty much stopped doing those additions becasue I found, as you did, that they don't do much. Try whirlpool hopping or dry hopping for the best hop aroma.


1

How are you cooling the wort? If you take too long to cool your wort after adding hops at the end of the boil, the high temperature of the wort may still allow isomerization, which would diminish the aroma.


1

What hops are you using? Some hops do not make good aroma hops at all, they are bittering only. How old are they? The older a hop, the less aroma you'll get from them. How do you store them? If they're stored without oxygen, in a freezer, they will be fresher when you use them. The less fresh hops are, the less aroma they produce. How do you ferment? ...


1

Yes, it has been done many times.


1

I think you would have to make that adapter yourself. Water heater threads are usually NPS or standard threads where your SS fittings are NPT Pipe threads. Your best bet is to weld the correct bung or adapter into the keg side. I have seen 120V 1400+W immersion heaters that use o-ring style seals but will not heat as well as 220v elements. Another choice ...


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