8

I've recently done the experiment. Zero boil hops, but dry-hopped with 6 ounces of high alpha acid hops (Summit, Simcoe and Apollo). This brew is quite bitter, whatever the reason, and it is of the same "kind" of bitterness one would expect from hopping in the boil and not particularly astringent.


7

The advice that I give all new brewers is to taste what you have at every step. Taste your grain, taste your runnings, taste your wort when it goes into the fermenter and, of course, taste it when you bottle or keg. As long as you used sanitary practices, you'll end up with beer, and most likely, better beer than you'll find at your local pub. 61 IBUs isn'...


5

I've had bitter hop flavor come from dry hopping as well. The quoted text from the OP makes sense to me: Dry hopping is essentially creating a tincture. Don't believe me? Drop 3 grams of a high alpha hop in a liter of vodka and come back in a month, chose something fruity and popular like mosaic or galaxy. 3 grams is toughly equal to 2 oz in a 5 gallon ...


4

The most important number when trying to balance bitterness in a beer is the ratio of international bittering units to starting gravity. This is often expressed as BU:GU (bittering units to gravity units). For reference, this posting has a more detailed explanation and some example BU:GU numbers for popular styles. Some Googling will get you some BU:GU ...


3

While beers can be very bitter to taste soon after fermentation they will mellow with age and become less bitter. I made an insanely bitter DIPA some time back and thought I had made a really bad mistake in brewing it. After 8 months it was considered one of my finest brews by friends who sampled it. So beers that are initially very bitter, perhaps too ...


3

Its possible that the added vegetal material will be an issue in a style as delicate as Kölsch. But like you mention, I too have loaded up beers with more than twice your proposed amount and been OK (albeit not in a Kölsch). What would worry me more is that 2.3% Alpha Acids is really on the low end for Hallertau. I'd be worried about the quality of the ...


3

Bitterness in a big stout is more than just the IBUs from hops. There is going to be a contribution of perceived bitterness from the roasted malts as well. Sometimes hopping a big roasty beer to a certain IBU value will result in a beer that is too bitter because the IBU calculation doesn't account for that roast malt contribution. This phenomenon is ...


3

A quick idea which works for me. After bottled. when serving the beer. Pint glass put 1/4 teaspoon of granulated white sugar (regular sugar u put in coffee). Pour your beer into glass n sugar.Play with this to your liking. Works well for my unbearably bitter IPA.


3

Yes, hops contain two major organic acids generally refereed to as alpha acids and beta acids. When hops are added to boiling wort about 40% of the alpha acids undergo a thermal isomerization to form isoalpha acids. Iso-alpha acids are the actual bitter compound found in beer. When people talk about IBU they are talking about the concentration of isoalpha ...


3

Hops add bittering via isomerization. When you add the hops to the boil, the alpha acids are extracted, and eventually isomerize and provide bitter flavors. This happens with or without sugars. Ray Daniels's book Designing Great Beers has lots of useful formulae and equations, including how to calculate IBU. Basically it looks like this: IBU = Woz * U% *...


3

Typically, the Hop bitterness in beer lessens over time. So, you should expect the first taste of the beer to be more bitter than the last drop.


3

If it's still fermenting, you're likely just experiencing the hops still in suspension. After fermentation is complete, a LOT of this material and the associated bitterness will drop out of suspension. In other words, it is very normal for a beer, of ANY style, to taste very bitter after just 3 days of fermentation, then to have it all mellow out after the ...


2

A friend of mine said he had cold brewed coffee using a french press. This makes it less bitter and you still get a lot of the good coffee flavors [http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2012/05/how-to-cold-brew-coffee.html]. Still will have to adjust the overall amount you add though and keep the balance with the hops. His beer he made this way turned out ...


2

Reading a little about humulone isomerisation, it seems that both Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions catalyse the reaction, while aqueous alkali is also mentioned (see e.g. Table 8.2 in However, Brewing: Science and Practice by Chris A. Boulton and Peter A. Brookes). All three are present in your tap water but not in the distilled. I would conclude that the bitterness you ...


2

This study demonstrated that iso-alpha acids degraded more quickly in low pH environments, particularly at lower temperatures. If I'm understanding this correctly, I think this means that lower pH beers will lose bitterness more rapidly over time, compared to high pH. Perhaps your experiments are showing the same effect. The high pH samples were more bitter ...


2

There's plenty of commercial beers that exceed 100 IBUs, some go to absurd levels. A lot of my favorite DIPA's have over 100 (Stone's Ruination being the first that comes to mind). I've had the IBU debate with others who have made the claim of the human threshold on hops. No one has been able to cite a factual source on whether or not such a theory is at ...


2

All hops contribute both aroma and bitterness in varying degrees. Grouping them into 4 hard categories is somewhat arbitrary. In general they are grouped as aroma vs bitterness, but if you wanted to you could simply use more "aroma hops" early in your boil and still end up more bitterness (and vice versa).


2

Dry airlock - You may be ok, it's not an ideal scenerio, but the dry air lock alone may have been enough to protect the beer for a couple days. Cross fingers. Super bitter - check your recipe, double check hop addition times and amounts, type (pellet, whole). If the recipe doesn't call for aging, some over hopping may have happened. Time will most ...


2

This is a good question, and I've talked to a few people that agree. I think it's just the nature of the recipe definition/creation process (especially historically): we control most directly the OG, not the FG, even if we're able to anticipate/estimate it. But, yes, we're really trying to control the bitterness:sweetness ratio in the consumed beer, and FG ...


2

Not really. Time will reduce the bitterness somewhat, but not a great deal. If it's undrinkable, your best bet is to brew a second beer with very little hop bitterness and blend the two beers.


2

Your notes indicate that with this batch (218) you are back to using S04 as the yeast. If batch 208 was brewed using a different yeast that is probably a big part of the answer. Different yeasts hold onto hop oils and alpha acids in different ways. Its quite possible that you'd notice a perceived difference in IBUs if the yeast was different. This is also ...


2

I would just boost the dextrins in the beer knowing that you will have additional oils from the chocolate (and the coffee). While its a good idea, I'm not sure cold-crashing/skimming would get all of the oil as a lot of it may still be dissolved in solution. Add some oats, extra flaked barley and/or dextrin malt to the mash. With respect to the coffee ...


2

Brew a less bitter batch and blend them.


2

Don't dry hop. Bottle and leave for 6-9 months,or more. The bitterness will decrease noticeably with time. A beer considered much to "bitter" or "hop tangy" will be quite mild and enjoyable after one year. If the beer must be drunk or thrown then try adding some non fermentable sweetener like lactose or stevia to a test pint. Some times the sourness/...


2

As has been mentioned before: a predicted IBU of 62 really isn't anything to worry about for an IPA. BJCP 2015[1] lists the range of IBU for American IPA as 40-70. Depending on the yeast, specifically its attenuation your beer might end up a little unbalanced due to your low OG. Again, BJCP 2015 specifies 1.056-1.070 for American IPA. Coincidentally, there ...


2

Tannins will be apparent as an astringent dry bitter mouthfell that doesn't fade on quickly at all. It doesn't take much time to extract tannins. But requires temp 170°F or above AND a pH of 6.0 or more. Of this temp slip happened late in the mash its very likely that your pH was below 6.0 and there's no risk of tannins. One tell tell sign is that your ...


2

To answer this specific question: 'does the wort(?) taste extremely bitter before fermentation vs. after?' Typically yes. Bitterness from hops is in the form of hydrophobic (water-repelling) iso-alpha acids. During fermentation these will tend to associate with: Yeast cells (taste some yeast slurry and you're sure to notice how bitter it is) Fermenter ...


1

As indicated in the other answer, your primary culprit is probably the hops. Alternately, if you don't know your water chemistry makeup, you could be experiencing excess sulfate - your sulfate-to-chloride ratio has a very heavy effect on the perception of your hops and malt. I strongly advise reading John Palmer's article about brewing water, or even better,...


1

Did you use pellets instead of leaves? If so, you need to adjust the amount downwards. My experience is that there is not a one to one relation between pellets and leaves. Erlo


1

I have used low AA hops such as Saaz 3-4% in a bittering role and high AA hops such as Amarillo 8-11% in a Aroma flavour role, both to very good effect. There are no hard and fast rules on this. One thing to remember is that the flavour and aroma profile of bittering hops will come through in the final brew, even if you boil for 60-90 min. All modern hops ...


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