7

The advice that I give all new brewers is to taste what you have at every step. Taste your grain, taste your runnings, taste your wort when it goes into the fermenter and, of course, taste it when you bottle or keg. As long as you used sanitary practices, you'll end up with beer, and most likely, better beer than you'll find at your local pub. 61 IBUs isn'...


5

Bitterness is not linear throughout the boil, so you cannot assume that it will be twice as bitter after 60 minutes vs. 30 minutes. I'm also not sure that you're going to get a great sense of the bitterness in the partially-boiled wort vs. the finished beer, but I don't have a really compelling argument as to why not. But I'm not understanding something ...


3

Its possible that the added vegetal material will be an issue in a style as delicate as Kölsch. But like you mention, I too have loaded up beers with more than twice your proposed amount and been OK (albeit not in a Kölsch). What would worry me more is that 2.3% Alpha Acids is really on the low end for Hallertau. I'd be worried about the quality of the ...


3

Fuggles aren't typically used for bittering being as their alpha's are so low. I have never experienced a bitter harshness from use of fuggles. Of course it's all recipe dependent, what was your hop schedule?


3

A quick idea which works for me. After bottled. when serving the beer. Pint glass put 1/4 teaspoon of granulated white sugar (regular sugar u put in coffee). Pour your beer into glass n sugar.Play with this to your liking. Works well for my unbearably bitter IPA.


2

Just today I read the brief descriptions of Herkules and Hallertauer Merkur in Stan Hieronymus's "For the Love of Hops". FWIW, a summary: Herkules is described as "smoothly bitter, a reminder that assessing cohumulone's role is complicated." No discussion of aroma, so I'd follow your nose with this one. Hallertauer Merkur is described as "a bittering hop ...


2

A hop tea may work. However, the bitterness extracted from hops at pH > 6 becomes progressively harsher with higher pH. Thus, to get a more rounded bitterness, you should not boil in plain water, which has a pH > 7. You could try boiling the hops in a little of the fermented beer, since this will have pH in the ball park of what you need. (Fermented beer is ...


2

There's plenty of commercial beers that exceed 100 IBUs, some go to absurd levels. A lot of my favorite DIPA's have over 100 (Stone's Ruination being the first that comes to mind). I've had the IBU debate with others who have made the claim of the human threshold on hops. No one has been able to cite a factual source on whether or not such a theory is at ...


2

With the hops you have listed, I'd go with Challenger or Target, and keep the IBU's in the 20-25 range to minimize the flavor. For the Dry Hopping, about an ounce in a 5gal batch is detectable, while a radio of 1:1 ounces/gallons is the standard way to get pungent dry-hop goodness. If you want the dry hop aroma to be fairly strong, I'd split the batch into ...


2

Both Denny Conn and mdma were correct to some extent. I am not able to pick who answered the question fully at this go of it. So I’ll answer with my own results and hope others experiment further to dial in the process. I planned on splitting a 5 gallon batch all along for comparison so I wouldn't feel it wasn't wasted if it didn't turn out. The design ...


2

Brew a less bitter batch and blend them.


2

Steeping caramel / crystal malts in water may still extract fermentables. As far as I know up to about 30% of what you would get from mash. See this site - it claims that Special B will give out a lot of sugar. If I read the numbers correctly, every 3 grams of steeped Special B will introduce about 1 gram of fermentables. Substitute grams for any unit of ...


2

Yes you could, in theory, do this. boiling in that small of a scale, you will lose hop utilization, and maybe difficult to calculate final IBUs. also sanitation, if you add this to post boil wort to bitter, there is a chance of introducing other things that may spoil your beer....


2

As has been mentioned before: a predicted IBU of 62 really isn't anything to worry about for an IPA. BJCP 2015[1] lists the range of IBU for American IPA as 40-70. Depending on the yeast, specifically its attenuation your beer might end up a little unbalanced due to your low OG. Again, BJCP 2015 specifies 1.056-1.070 for American IPA. Coincidentally, there ...


2

Don't dry hop. Bottle and leave for 6-9 months,or more. The bitterness will decrease noticeably with time. A beer considered much to "bitter" or "hop tangy" will be quite mild and enjoyable after one year. If the beer must be drunk or thrown then try adding some non fermentable sweetener like lactose or stevia to a test pint. Some times the sourness/...


1

If your options are 1 and 2, then I guess try dryhopping it and see how that goes. As pointed out in the comments, that won't make it less bitter, but it might improve the beer. It won't add a ton of bitterness, dryhopping will mostly add aroma. Maybe try something like citra to add some dimension to the profile. While you cannot make the beer less bitter ...


1

Having eaten a quince and tasted a cider apple I do not think that a quince is as bitter as a cider apple, but it may depend on the quince. If the quince juice is tasting as bitter as black tea then I would go with your suggestion and only bitter the half from eating apples. Please report back on how it turns out.


1

Since you don't necessarily need the beer to be completely non-alcoholic, perhaps you could consider brewing an small (session) beer instead? Mashing at the higher end, perhaps with some flavourful caramel malts, wheat or rye for extra body and an small grain bill should give you a head start. I did some experiences with second (and third) runnings from ...


1

You cannot make a truly alcohol free beer. The best commercial brewers can do is get it down to about .5% ABV. At home, most report that about 1.5% ABV can be achieved with boiloff. However, it is reported to have a severely negative impact on flavor. Having tried this, I would advise you not to waste your time. The bitterness is concentrated, not ...


1

Thanks everybody for your help, after some research I think that what I experienced is mostly because of those reasons: Fuggles has a not so low cohumulone content, compared with noble hops. Moreover the one I used was (not English) Fuggles, which has higher cohumulone content than English Fuggles In my particular case the hops used were harvested in 2011 (...


1

Pick a juice and make a shandy. I made a grapefruit IPA that ended up getting more bitter than I wanted. So, I decided to make a shandy out of it. I ended up adding 1.5 quarts of grapefruit juice to the keg after trying different ratios. I added an additional 1/2 gallon grapefruit juice after carbonating to get more juice flavor. This worked very well. ...


1

Chew paracetamol before drinking it and it will taste great after that! No seriously , I'm sitting here with the same problem. My idea is to balance out with sugar even though that's bringing me away from the dry crispness that I was after. My initial thought was to boil equal amounts of sugar and water to make a simple syrup and then experiment with the ...


1

I would suggest aging the beer, and if that doesnt work, blend it with a nice, sweet, malty amber ale.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible