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10

Just clean it up and replace the airlock sanitizer fluid. If you have a second airlock just prep it and swap. If not just cover with sanitized foil while cleaning.


7

There is no reason to secondary that beer. Most homebrewers these days don't bother with secondary unless adding fruit or something else that will cause fermentation to restart. Here's what John Palmer, Jamil Zainisheff and others have to say...."Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ...


6

If you leave it out, you will not have a tripel. Even more than alcohol, the sugar is there for what's referred to as "digestibility". It lightens the body of the beer. If you leave it out you will be making a different style of beer.


6

Alcohol itself adds to flavour/aroma, and to perception of body, the latter being critical for tripel, characterized by its dryness. So, the answer depends on what you mean by "lighter" here. If you mean just "less alcohol", then sure, leave out the sugar. If "lighter" is about compounded perception of lightness, then you may want to reduce grain, too. In ...


6

Mistake 1, really doesn't matter all will be fine. You may end up with a little more bitterness extraction, but is has been reported that FWH can lead to a more mellow bitterness. I really would not worry at all. Mistake 2, not really all should be fine You would get a cleaner flavour profile if you had used 2 packets of yeast,but your yeast should be ...


5

There's no reason you can't ferment a 2.5 gal. batch in a 5 gal. gal. carboy, at least through 3-4 weeks of primary fermentation.


5

Without much detail regarding your recipes, your answer is going to be a bit shallow and lacking in detail. Regardless, here goes nothing: First off: Glass or plastic makes no difference in today's home brewing world as studies have shown plastic carboy's oxygen permeability is a non-issue compared to glass. Secondly, most Lambics' yeast contains wild ...


4

The two you will want to use are either Wyeast 3763 Roeselare blend, or WLP655 Belgian Sour mix. If you want to get real squirrely, follow the Mad Fermentationist's lead and go grab a (fresh) bottle or two of your favorite sours from the store, smoothly pour out all but the last half inch of the bottle, swirl the dregs settled at the bottom of the bottle, ...


4

It can help head retention and other aspects of the beer with the right grain bill, but fully modified malts don't benifiet from it. Typically a acid / protein rest is applied to release the amino acids needed for yeast to produce good clove esters for appropriate styles. Moderately-modified malts benefit from a protein rest to break down any remnant large ...


4

No, you did not. Belgian yeast usually don't mind fast temperature increase. Just be sure not to exceed max temperature suggested by yeast supplier. And just by the way, the one time I had temperature raising too fast was with Belgian yeast, too. Similar with the people I talked with. Seems that these strains simply like to surprise us with heat production.


4

This is a high gravity beer right? Just wait, it will get there. Ensure they are stored somewhere good for ale temperatures (> 15C / 60F). If you're really worried, give them a gentle shake every day for a few days. Just enough to rouse the yeast.


3

It's not that raising too fast was the issue, but raising too soon could be. You' be better off waiting 72-96 hours before raising the temp. Simply put, your situation is not critical but it could be better. Fortunately the Duvel yeast throws relatively few esters so you may be OK.


3

A week might not be long enough (especially if your yeast is particularly beleaguered, which would depend mostly on what the ABV of the finished beer is and how long it's been since fermentation). Also, make sure your bottles are in a warm enough area (~70 °F is ideal for bottle-conditioning). Lower than this and it can definitely take several weeks, even ...


3

A 3 Gallon Carboy is $20 USD i think. I would much rather let my beer condition the proper length of time then be dissatisfied with the end product. After all about $20ish worth of materials probably went into the beer no? As to bottle conditioning vs secondary conditioning. While yes you can simply condition in the bottles you will be waiting longer and ...


3

The fruit very likely has sugar, so it will cause fermentation to kick-off again when added, thus producing CO2. Obviously not with the same vigour as primary fermentation - although if you added a lot of fruit, maybe. Is the yeast able to get into the fruit? The skins are fairly tough for yeast, so will need to be broken somewhat. I typically mush my ...


2

If what you want is candy syrup, sold as D2 etc in American homebrew stores, then you need to read this explanation of what it really is and how to make it. In Dutch it is "kandizuiker" and this has been mistranslated/misinterpreted as meaning candy sugar, which it is not. It is really a Maillard syrup, made by reacting sugar with amino acids in an ...


2

I'd say your plan sounds reasonable, if a bit involved. A stab at your primary question: to avoid hassle you'll want to use a mesh bag of some kind, to keep solids out, and the beer clear. It needs to be BIG so that you get good surface area exposed in solution. Also tie it to a string so you can pull it out when finished. Also, a few thoughts went up in my ...


2

"Is this required for the beer to be fermented properly?" No, it should be fermented fully within a couple weeks at most, though Belgian yeast can be a bit finicky. However the bigger issue is conditioning time. Belgian quads are usually ~11+%ABV. If you drink that two weeks after fermentation is done, it'll probably taste a bit like gasoline (a lot of '...


2

As this is definitely "an experiment" (great!) I suppose one could go about it with some "scientific procedure". I agree that yeast begins to falter in very concentrated sugar solutions. There is a point (eg about 8Kg glucose in 24 litres of water) at which the strength of the sugar solution inhibits yeast metabolism. An extreme example is honey (or treacle) ...


2

This is a valid way to do it. There will be a slight amount of air and therefore oxygen sucked in, but not enough that I would worry about it.


2

Yeah, it will. Probably not bad, but different.


2

What style of beer are you planning to brew with it? I suggest picking a yeast acording to this style, not so much the hop variety. Belgian beer styles are usually quite dry, patially due to the yeast but also due to the ingredients used (sugars) and the low mash temps / multiple mash steps. Belgian yeasts do add a lot of flavors which might not pair well ...


2

1. Hops before boil This won't be an issue if the recipe calls for them to be a 45min+ addition. 2. Yeast pitch If the recipe calls for two, then use two. Most yeast packs are intended for 5 gallons of 1.040 wort. More yeast is needed for higher OGs. The LHBS may have been inclined to allow for more ester profile, since it's a Belgian Strong which relies ...


2

You wanna look at this guy: https://suigenerisbrewing.blogspot.com/2013/09/making-belgian-candi-sugar.html As he points out, most recipes only invert and then caramelise sugar, whereas Candi sugar relies on Maillard reactions, which require a higher pH. He uses picling lime, which I can't find here. I use a few drops of food grade NaOH instead. It works ...


1

Mistake #1 actually depends on the recipe: There is a technique called first wort hopping where the bittering hops are added when the wort is collected from the mash. Normally, one would use 10% less hops than when adding them to the boil. The result could be that your beer is a little bit more bitter than anticipated, but letting it condition longer ...


1

I have used maple syrup when making Belgian style beer - which was nice but gave a different result to Candi syrup. Not a great difference and definitely not a bad difference, but it was detectable. Perhaps a bit more caramel?


1

That is somewhat the desired outcome for a Belgian yeast to do. The amount of "funk" is always up to each individual. I have used this particular strain to make Saison and Witbier styles with good results, although each of these styles in my opinion are at the low end of funky Belgian styles. The temperature of fermentation, cleanliness, grain bill, all ...


1

There really is no advantage to waiting to add the sugar. Get it in there now.


1

Since "Leffe Brune" is one of my favorite beer. I have tried to clone it for a while. I have now created a recipe that is incredibly similar. I can not distinguish between the beer in a test. Smoked malt gives the taste of pine tar, and that use of Safbrew T-58 provides a high FG, allowing that the sweetness remains. All malts are from Weyermann. ...


1

When can you get the yeast? I would definitely not go for it if you're not going to be able to let it get started at all. If you can get the yeast a day or two in advance and get it partially started then you're more likely to avoid off flavors. Even if you have to cut it a little short. You might try buying a couple packs and giving those a short start. ...


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