8

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


4

There's many factors that effect attenuation. The %s are a ball park under normal conditions, factoring average unfermentables and ABVs. In theory all yeasts are capable of 100% attenuation of the fermentable sugars up to their ABV tolerance with a lot of nurturing. In your case 4 points off may not be that far out of scope. If the sweetness is balanced it ...


3

I think you are over thinking and and mis-interpreting the point of the "theory of mashing" article. That table regarding mash temp and attenuation is only specific to the wort tested. It's meant as a demonstration of how increasing temps may make a less fermentable wort. Fermentability of a wort is based on much more than temperature of the mash. The ...


3

I'd suspect either a faulty thermometer that's reading deceptively low is to blame, or perhaps your mash water chemistry is really off and you aren't getting full conversion. For the former, check your thermometer in crushed ice-water to ensure that its reading 32F, and in boiling water to ensure its 212F. Don't be shocked if you can't get it to read 212F ...


3

The Dupont strain is a kinda special beast. We found in an experiment on Experimental Brewing that you need to open ferment it to prevent the stall. Whether it's pressure or CO2 toxicity hasn't been determined. Assuming you're using an airlock, remove it and use a piece if foil loosely over your fermenter. That should fix it. https://www....


3

I have never found S-04 to be slow. Even on 500L batches, I've had beers with S-04 ferment dry in under 5 days. It also flocs out like a ton of bricks. Are you confident you don't have a contamination with another, more attenuative yeast? Are you also confident you got your OG and FG readings right, and calculated the AA right? As jsolarski says, without a ...


3

The attenuation rating of a yeast is meant for comparing one yeast to another and is not necessarily an indication of the attenuation you can expect That is far more dependent on the fermentability of the wort. Using the same yeast but changing the wort, I can easily get anywhere from 65-85% attenuation. Beersmith is doing nothing more than making a guess....


3

Yes it's totally possible. But I would expect a lower OG than you estimate. 1.071 is possible to drop out that quick but not very likely. Take a hydrometer AND refractometer reading on the finished beer and feedbthose values to the tool in BeerSmith under refractometer tools to get an actual OG estimate.


2

The mash temperature can also have an effect on attenuation (fermentability). I will quote Denny Conn, from this post: Yeast attenuation and fermentable sugars Yeast attenuation is determined by the yeast lab under laboratory conditions, and it is only a way of comparing one yeast relative to another using the same wort. You may or may not achieve the ...


2

smaller the batch, usually the faster the fermentation will happen. my 1.5 gal batches took less then 5 days to reach F.G. also with out a recipe posted, a more ferment-able wort will attenuate more. the given attenuation on yeast are for lab conditions. if it continues then yes, it could be contaminated, but if it stops, then its just the yeast doing ...


2

Everything Chthon said is sound, but to put it a little more concisely, fermentability and attenuation are two unrelated things. Wort fermentablility refers to what proportion of the wort consists of fermentable sugars. Attenuation refers to what percentage of available fermentable sugars a yeast strain will typically ferment. The two things are both ...


2

I was able to find at least one paper in which a standardized wort was used to classify many (153) yeast strains based on, among four other parameters, degree of attenuation. The wort used was an 'All-malt hopped wort (specific gravity 1040, pH 5.0, attenuation limit ca. 1006) [...] prepared according to [another paper]...' This second paper referenced ...


2

I have veiwed a few papers and this one contained similar proportions to other references but was the only one to contain a reference for the source of the proportions. Isolation and Characterization of Brewer's Yeast Variants with Improved Fermentation Performance under High-Gravity Conditions Which references: 8.6.1 Fermentability, Attenuation Limit of ...


2

In my experience yeast gives up early when I see it drop out of high krausen / exponential growth / feeding phases in 1-2 days. It's the first sign for me to be diligent in taking readings and making adjustments to keep it going well. There's many reasons why this effects final gravity. Over all its speculated that when the yeast works too fast in growth ...


2

To expand on my comment above: For most homebrewers, unless you're willing to drop some serious money on lab equipment, your measurements will be mostly limited to weights, volumes and specific gravity (and pressure, if kegging). Most of the numbers you'll be dealing with outside these things will involve calculations based on a best-fit equations for most ...


2

I would focus on the yeast. How old were the yeast packs? Viability and cell count starts to drop off after just a few weeks. How big was the starter and what was the O.G.? Did you use a stir plate? There is a yeast calculator at Mr. Malty that I have found to be helpful. A stir plate helps quite a bit too. Make sure the temperature of your starter is near ...


2

I used to mash-in my berliner at 150 F, and then just let it cool down to 120 F or so. From there my souring process was pretty much identical to yours. But, I usually pitched straight L delbruckii, with a followup pitch of WLP630 or some other ale yeast(s). With multiple organisms at work, there's more potential for attenuation, and I would always see the ...


2

The analogy used with stones in water is a poor one, the reason being that stones are large and follow stokes law for particle size. They most certainly sink immediately, however, if you crushed up almost any rock or clay to the size of a yeast cell they would be suspended in the liquid and would contribute buoyancy to the hydrometer. The density change ...


2

It all comes down to mash temp. Lower mash temps(145-148) will yield more fermentable sugars. Down side is you lower your mash efficiency and need to compensate with more grain or adjuncts. But you will have a substantially dry beer. Even with a iipa you should be able to hit 1.01.


2

Water may be the problem, but I'd focus on some easier solutions first. Confirming mash temp with a second thermometer. Mashing a little thinner (1.5-1.75qt/lb)and cooler (145-149F). And I would strongly recommend repeating one of the same beers you've already made so you can compare the end result with a prior result. THIS IS VITAL otherwise you really ...


2

While I'm not entirely sure what you're proposing is true (see below), here are some points to consider which potentially support your claim: Saccharomyces bayanus has an active fructose uptake system, while S. cerevisiae relies on 'facilitated diffusion' to uptake fructose. Meaning? S. bayanus actually expends cellular energy to bring fructose into the ...


1

It could be that your pack wasn't as healthy or fresh as what you are used to seeing with Nottingham packs. I saw several other posts online of poor fermentation characters from this same yeast. So comparing the attenuation from one manufacturer to the next might be a little misleading. I'd had to see how low attenuating mangrove jack yeast strain would ...


1

The attenuation rating for yeast is meant as a way of comparing one strain to another using a standard wort. It may not reflect the attenuation you can actually expect. The actual attenuation is much more dependent on wort composition than attenuation rating. Using the same yeast I can get anywhere from about 60-85% attenuation depending on the wort.


1

I made the following beer: 90% malted 2-row barley 10% flaked maize mashed between 66 and 69 degrees celcius 1.043 original gravity fermented with M79 1.011 final gravity Had I fermented this with my usual Nottingham, I would have expected this to get down to around 1.007 FG. I fermented with M79, and it only got down to about 1.011 (about 70% ...


1

It can be for a few reasons: 1. Underpitching (not enough yeast), 2. Insufficient wort aeration before pitching, 3. Cold shock, 4. Old yeast that you bought in a store -- well the last one is actually underpitching again. What to do: 1. Make a good 1.5-2 l starter, start it 2-4 days before the brew day, 2. Aerate wort well, not just swirl it in a fermenter ...


1

If your pH is that high in your water you'll want to lower it. pH that high will stop conversion/make it take longer. Look at using salts to add base to the water, also make sur eyou are using campden tablets to remove the chlorine and chloramine from your tap water if that what you brew with, yeast hate it.


1

This is an alternative to adding Enzymes Post boil. Instead of adding enzymes, You can add unboiled wort to your fermentor after fermentation has started to try to lower FG. The unboiled wort should be pulled before "mashing out", to keep the enzymes intact. I have read this awhile ago, but unable to find the source. but it should make a dryer beer. ...


1

Is your goal in high gravity beers to make it lighter bodied? Adding enzymes after fermentation will accomplish this, but it will take time (like you said) and it will not lead to any more alcohol production. Might I suggest a more popular and proven alternative to using enzymes to thin your high gravity beer: mash at a lower temperature (or conduct a step ...


1

You should not let your enzymes get above 60 degrees Celcius. According to this article the Beano enzyme works best at 40 degrees Celcius. You should add your enzymes on cooldown of the wort.


1

The best way is indeed to wait until the fermentation is completely over. When you measure the same (low) gravity for 2-3 days in a row this is the case. The also allows for the yeast to clean up the by-products. The bottom of your fermentation vessel will have a bottom of yeast, but normally there is still (much more than) enough yeast in suspension to ...


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