9

The only definitive information I could find specific to your question was in the book Malts and Malting: '[Malt] must be stored cool and dry in sealed stores [...] to arrest the decline in enzyme levels' One brief and somewhat vague sentence in 750 pages may give you an idea of how little professional maltsters and brewers seem to concern themselves ...


8

Excellent question, which I know every detail-focused brewer wonders about at some point. The reason we don't go up to alpha temperature right away and then drop down is that the beta enzyme denatures relatively very quickly above about 150°F (65.6°C). You could look into the actual science on this but in my estimation it seems the majority of beta ...


3

While I am not aware of any firm definition for thin vs. thick mash, your estimates of 1.25 to 1.5 quarts per pound do seem close to the mark for an average range for most homebrewers. For many years I have targeted an average ratio of about 1.3 qt/lb, with great results. That being said, I do sometimes go as high as about 1.75 qt/lb, which is thin but not ...


2

"Pilsner enzyme" is different from other brewing or distilling enzyme. It's not derived from malt and is a exogenous enzyme. It can do the same job as malt enzymes but at lower temps and different pH. Allowing it to be added to the wort at fermentation to break down sugars the yeast can't use so they can use them resulting in a dryer beer. There is no need ...


2

Malting companies will provide the DP values for each malt (at least some do, ie: https://www.simpsonsmalt.co.uk/our-malts/finest-pale-ale-maris-otter/) The process of "roasting" malts (caramel, chocolat...) will decrease the value, so in general, speciality malts will have less DP. You may calculate an average DP for your recipe, but remember that ...


2

Good question. No I don't believe mechanical forces can break down enzymes to the extent that it would be a concern. Viewed through a magnifying lens or microscope, blender blades will have a relatively enormous surface area compared to your enzymatic molecules. The blade will push the enzymes around but the only damage done potentially could be if the ...


2

For most of our brews we shoot for 65°C (148°F)for 90 min, we find this gives us a highly fermentable wort with enough longer chain dextrins for good mouthfeel. This is the usual temp I see most of my colleagues going for apart from those doing the more weird stuff. For stouts we shoot for 68°C (155°F), for more mouthfeel. I believe that in older less well ...


2

Amylase enzyme basically works by breaking down maltodextrins (longer chain sugars) to simpler sugars that the yeast can ferment. The effect of this is to decrease the specific gravity of the final brew. This makes the beer lighter and less turbid - typical of a pilsner. The enzyme is often called pilsner enzyme becuase of this particular use. The enzyme ...


1

Best I can do this evening is this, but I will dig further: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/j.2050-0416.2005.tb00646.x/full Here is PDF link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/j.2050-0416.2005.tb00646.x/pdf


1

I suppose that outside of the US, Pilsner and/or lager malt is the one with the most diastatic power. Here in Europe, 6-row is not malted for the brewing industry, it is only used for cattle food. Edit: just to make it more clear, I suppose that it is called Pilsner enzyme, because it is used as a replacement for Pilsner malt, in cases one needs or wants to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible