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13

Not at all. Technically, you may be losing an absolutely, immeasurably tiny amount of alcohol, but it would have to vaporize from the beer, absorb or condense into whatever liquid is in your airlock and then vaporize out the other side. But practically speaking (which is what's really important) you'll never have to worry about this in an air-locked vessel....


7

Water - it's cheap, it's always available, and does the job adequately. No need for anything else when something so simple works so well.


6

Moonshine is the name for illegally made spirits of non-specific ingredients. So I will answer your question as if you asked something like: "How do I make spirits". Caveat: Currently, as far as I know, New Zealand is the only country where home distilling is legal. Drinking-grade spirits are made by taking a fermented liquid, distilling it, discarding ...


6

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


6

Beer made from barley malt will contain almost no methanol. Fruits high in pectin will produce some methanol, but it's only a health concern if you're distilling. (That being said, I've had some nasty hangovers after drinking plum wine.) I've never heard of a test strip to determine the methanol quantity of a liquid. If such a thing existed, the home ...


5

Alcohol Losses from Entrainment in Carbon Dioxide Evolved during Fermentation H. W. Zimmermann, E. A. Rossi Jr. and E. Wick + Author Affiliations Research and Development, United Vintners, Asti, California Abstract Total losses of alcohol entrained in CO2 in laboratory experiments were shown to increase with: temperature of fermentation, alcohol level of ...


4

No, the alcohol is dispersed throughout the beer. Indeed, the entire thing is homogenous.


4

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


4

If you don't want to do refractometry or hydrometry, your next best generic option would be ebulliometry, which is basically measuring the bubble point of the liquid, where the bubble point depends upon how much alcohol is there.


4

You will not achieve 40% using fermentation as the only technique. Yeast have a certain alcohol tolerance that is usually between 14% and 18% (wine yeast), above that percentage, yeast will stop working. Depending of your yeast strain (check the yeast pack for this information), it should stop working around the alcohol tolerance (more or less). To ...


4

Right so there's no "optimal" method for this, brewing is a balancing act between sweetness, alcohol, carbonation-pressure and yeast. Even things like the shape of the fermentation vessel effect the performance of the yeast. You will always need a little trial and tweaking, and this is part of the fun. So a ginger beer "bug" (or "plant") is typically a ...


3

There are relatively affordable devices (iSpindel and TILT) that continuously report specific gravity wirelessly. You can use the data to derive the alcohol content with a pretty good degree of accuracy. It's not exactly what you asked for but it wouldn't be too hard to make it work the way you want.


3

The most reliable way to determine alcohol in any fermented drink, without the need for several thousand US dollars in equipment and some seriously technical laboratory procedures, is distillation. The answers already given provide good solutions in certain circumstances, but both will give incorrect readings in solutions with significant amounts of ...


3

A vinometer can mesure alcohol of a dry wine (all sugar needs to be fermented). You would need to add some dye to see the results if you have a transparent liquid. It can usually measure between 0 and 20%.


3

There is nothing better than glass from a standpoint of oxygen ingress. The next best choice would be PET, followed by polyethylene and polypropylene. With PE and PP the density of the material (which varies) is more important than the material itself. Go for HDPE and HDPP if you can get it, and avoid LDPE and LDPP.


3

Foil. :) Either vodka or star-san are perfectly fine. Water will work just as well. The liquid in an airlock does not strictly need to be sanitary, it just needs to provide a barrier for insects, primarily.


2

To Exactly answer your questions: Is it possible, Does anyone know the process? Yes, you would have to ferment some wine then add a very high ABV% of Alcohol, acquired, paid or distilled by another means. Example ratio: 300ml of 10% wine + 700ml of 80% spirit = 59%ABV How much yeast, should I use in the grape juice? Go for 1 tsp per gallon(4.5L). can I ...


2

Does alcohol vapor escape via the airlock? Yes, it does; however, the amount that escapes is negligible in terms of affecting the alcohol level in the fermenter. If you go up to the fermenter and smell the top of the airlock as the primary begins to settle down, there is a very distinct scent of alcohol among the other aromas of breadiness, malt and hops. ...


2

Well, theoretically you can add any kind of yeast to any kind of grape extract and, provided conditions are sanitary, you don't get an infection, and you give it enough time to ferment, you will have a wine of some sort. Unfortunately, it probably won't be very good. In fact, it will probably be horrible. To make drinkable wine will require proper juice, ...


2

To elaborate on my comment more. Some airlocks won't show tale tale signs of c02 that has already escaped if using a solution in them that won't form bubbles on their surface like pure water or alcohol. When using starsan (a foaming sanitizer) you will see bubbles or foam in the air lock long after fermentation has slowed. Giving you the assurance that ...


2

Short answers No and No. Although erythritol is an alcohol it does not count against the 'alcohol' tolerance of yeast. When we speak of the alcohol tolerance we are not strictly speaking about all alcohols but Ethanol, Ethyl Alcohol, or drinking alcohol. This is what we refer to when we say yeast is producing alcohol, and what is measured in the ABV on you ...


2

Polypropylene is commonly used for brewing buckets but is not so good for containing pressurised/fizzy drinks. PET is most commonly used for fizzy drinks bottles. PET soda bottles are good for storing beer for a while - for example 6 months. Over time the CO2 gas will slowly diffuse through the bottle walls and gradually depressurise the beer. Which means ...


2

Well you can quite simply calculate the amount of ethanol consumed easily: Stout 0.2L*13.49%=26.9mL Double IPA 0.33L*8.5%=28.05mL It would appear that the 0.33L DIPA delivered more ethanol.


2

IMHO HPLC is the best method probably followed by spectroscopy. measuring ABV by distillation is "indirect" due to the formation of an azeotropic mixture between alcohol and water. They cannot be separated easily by distillation although one can do a "back calculation" to esttimate (quite accurately) the percentage of alcohol in the original mixture.HPLC ...


2

Most alcohol is labeled with ABV (Alcohol by Volume). Therefore, if you have 1L of 96% alcohol mixed with 1L of water, you will have 2L of 48% ABV. Looking at density is something we do when fermenting to determine how much sugar has been converted to alcohol, but here you are just diluting and adding sugar; so you will not need to worry about densities of ...


2

Let's see if we can reverse engineer this :) The density of 95% ABV spirit is ~ 0.8 Therefore: 500g/0.8 => ~625ml of 95% spirit. 500g water is 500ml. but your 500g of sugar as it disolves will affect the volumes. In future I would make your sugar syrup, and then measure it in your 250ml cup, and measure out your spirit also in said cup. Will make the ...


2

The alcohol in limoncello or other liqueurs is almost always industrially produced, and thus fit for consumption. It does not contain methanol or fusel alcohols. So, made this way, liqueurs are not poisonous. When a fermented wash is distilled, the methanol and fusel alcohols escape first because they have a lower evaporation temperature than ethanol. So the ...


1

Disclaimer: I'm a New Zealander (the only country right now where home distillation is legal) and I distill spirits on a regular basis. I use a Robobrew with an Alembic Pot Still Attachment. Why a Robobrew? I started off brewing beer and wanted to reuse some of my equipment. Note that the Robobrew is almost useless for distilling unless you also invest in ...


1

There are sensors that do this. I am not personally familiar with their accuracy, maintenance or robustness. I am aware of this type of device from Anton-Paar https://www.anton-paar.com/us-en/products/group/alcohol-meter/?ref=adwords&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI8NbFgYKb4gIVV4ezCh0fUAdfEAAYASAAEgLswfD_BwE


1

More likely than not, your issue is with Phenolic and not Vanilla Extract (although, I would just use beans for brewing). Brad Smith has an excellent write up on that: Phenolics and Tannins in Home Brewed Beer. TL;DR This can be caused by Chloromines in your water (toss a campden tablet in your strike water), wild yeasts (sanitation issues) or mashing at ...


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