4

Home brewed beer and ciders are almost always safe to drink. Methanol (which is what some people are afraid of) can't be produced by the yeast in significant quantities, because the yeast simply doesn't have that ability. Just like all other food products, bacterial spoilage may make it go off to the point where consuming the product can be a health hazard, ...


3

You're experiencing a common off-flavor in cider called THP or tetrahydropyridine. Yes, it's safe to drink, but just doesn't taste all that great. I had this in one of my ciders a few years ago. They say it can taste like toasty, crackers, Cheerios, and I always say: Cheese Nips or Doritos... and at very high levels... urine or "mousy" which is referring ...


3

I chased a similar off flavor for years before I finally concluded it was coming from the US-05 yeast I was using. I'm not sure everyone can taste it, but it was very offensive to me. Dusty was the exact word I used to describe it. It was strongest in the finish of the first sip, and it grew weaker as I continued to drink. It wasn't every batch I brewed with ...


2

The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


2

This article may hold the answers you seek: https://winemakermag.com/1254-soapy-wines-vintage-dates-wine-wizard "...I suspect you’ve got a fatty acid issue caused by your stuck/sluggish fermentation. S. cerevisiae can emit fatty acids when under fermentative stress..." Stuck fermentations can be caused by a lack of dissolved oxygen in the first few days of ...


2

I agree that some more information is needed to see if this licorice flavor is actually to be expected in your beer style you brewed, but to offer an initial response to what the possible cause was, phenols from yeast production could cause anise (licorice) flavors. These can be produced when fermentation temperatures have gotten a little warmer than they ...


2

The only defect flavor I could relate to "Dusty" would be from oxidation. Most recognize it more as a wet cardboard flavor but I too have experienced it as a something more similar to opening an old dusty book if you were to translate a smell to a taste.


1

This is usually from overdose of campden tablets / potassium metabisulfite. Usually the only practical solution is dilution.


1

I've never tasted acetaminophen, but the 130g of black malt is probably your culprit. I made a stout with a similar amount, and the resulting beer was acrid and unpleasant. Aging mellowed it a bit, but it never turned into what I'd call a pleasant beer. For what it's worth, the only roasted malts I use in my stouts are roasted barley, and a small amount of ...


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