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IMHO mead does not generally need any adjustment of pH levels to ferment correctly. It is generally fermented to have a similar level of alcohol to a strong wine - which will not generally support bacterial growth. As the fermentation progresses the pH of the mead will naturally drop due to dissolved carbon dioxide. Mead has been made this way for a long ...


3

OK this is a great question; and with most great questions the answer is... yes complex. This is parts per thousand, not trillion. factor of 10^6 better but not really waht we need to know. pH... well it does relate to pH in a round about way... Oh, why did I ever do this... TL; DR; -> it is about titration g/liter to neutralise a solution, well to ...


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Acid content is generally measured by titration - a pH meter or test papers do not measure content only "acidity". The sourness is IMHO likely to be lactic acid as lactobacillius are generally present on fruit and will work directly on the sugars present. Acetobacter need alcohol (and oxygen) to produce the acetic acid (vinegar) so will generally only work ...


2

Adding baking soda - sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3)is a quick and cheap method to reduce acidity in foodstuffs- but beware of the sudden release of gas (CO2) and foaming. Strictly speaking any alkaline substance can be added to reduce acidity in solution. The trick is keep the taste at least "pleasant", if not "authentic", without rendering the drink dangerous....


2

Reading a little about humulone isomerisation, it seems that both Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions catalyse the reaction, while aqueous alkali is also mentioned (see e.g. Table 8.2 in However, Brewing: Science and Practice by Chris A. Boulton and Peter A. Brookes). All three are present in your tap water but not in the distilled. I would conclude that the bitterness you ...


2

With some ciders I experience the same burning sensation after a few ciders. I haven't figured out the exact causes yet but I will share a few theories worth testing: 1) Acidity. Some apples are much higher acidity than others. Also some yeasts will produce a higher acid product than others. And as Kingsley also alluded to, carbon dioxide is also acidic ...


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I now have fermentation - TL;DR: do not trust cheap digital instruments! The cheap Chinese pH meter I used was reporting nonsense, it turns out the juice was actually at 3.6pH (once tested with decent quality strips). So, nothing wrong with the acidity at all. I tried again with properly rehydrated Lalvin D47 from another supplier, and now have good ...


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Possibly, but you need patience it seems/ It is probably because of the baking soda that your wine tastes like this. You can't remove the molecules that are responsible for this anymore from your wine. However, I read that this is readily used, but you need a month or two for the results of this addition to drop out from the wine. I have made wine already ...


1

First thoughts: During fermentation, lots of un-tasty yeast by-products are created (including fusel alcohols). Giving the fermentation time to finish allows the yeast to re-process these by-products, but you're interrupting this by cold-crashing early. Second thought: 100 grams of sugar is enough to prime 20 litres / 5 gallons of cider. Your question ...


1

It's difficult to remove acidity from wine without affecting the flavour. You can add salts (calcium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate) to remove some acidity but this is considered a "last resort" solution. This PDF claims that honey contains malic acid, though it doesn't give a breakdown. It does, however, indicate that gluconic acid is the primary organic ...


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Starsan actually breaks down and is consumed by the yeast in your beer as if it was nutrient so long as you use it as directed. So seriously don't fear the foam.


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Two methods to lower acidity (raise pH) would be to use carbonate salt (potassium or calcium). In a pinch I guess you could try sodium carbonate (baking soda), but I'd recommend trying it on a smaller batch first to be sure it tasted OK. I guess it depends on how much acid you need to off-set. The second method would be to employ a malolactic fermentation ...


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Your corney keg will be fine. The issue of corrosion comes into play if there are unpassified areas, usually from cleaning with an abrasive. You can repassify to restore the oxide layer with a mild acid like starsan or bar keepers friend. Soak and let air dry.


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Before you adjust acidity, allow the fermentation to stop completely, and let the wine degas it's co2. Carbon dioxide in suspension increases acidity of a fluid. If you still feel it needs a reduction in acidity, cold stabilize the wine at just above freezing for a few weeks to let some of the tartaric acid to precipitate out of the wine. If you like to ...


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Tartic acid has a more tart/sour flavor. Malic is a little bit smoother. You can use less malic 2.7g a gallon compared to 3.8g a gallon to lower the ph 0.1.


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I have always used black tea stewed for about 30-45 min, and used as my about half of my brewing water, if you want to try with raisins have a look here: http://www.westchesterwinemakers.com/2013/05/31/x-18/


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Add some boiled Bicarbonate of Soda, that will drop the Ph, start with one tsp in about 50ml. Aim to get the Ph to around a bit above 4 and then you should be OK.


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5 ml. of lactic acid will be tasteless in your beer. I don't know why it's there, but you can skip it. 5 oz. of dextrose will not make much difference to the beer and is the normal amount used for bottle priming. Are you sure it isn't for that? Unmalted wheat flakes have no enzymes and can't be used without mashing with a base malt to convert the ...


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