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Yeast starters are small worts of 1L or more that contain no hops. The primary purpose is to awaken and grown the yeast supplied in a vial or smack-pack. Typical starter wort is around or under 1.040 in gravity.

1
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If you want to get a feeling for what the right quantity of yeast looks like, you could pitch a new dry sachet of yeast into a cold starter. An 11g sachet dry yeast has 150-200 billion cells - the ri …
answered Sep 11 '11 by mdma
1
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The stepwise additions you're making to keep the gravity lower is often done with high gravity brewing. It relieves the yeast from the osmotic stresses of the high gravity wort. 3 stages is probably …
answered May 7 '12 by mdma
5
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There are three main reasons for stepping up: having too much medium and too little yeast increases the risk of contamination considerably. a large quantity of medium causes the first few generation …
answered Aug 20 '12 by mdma
4
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Assuming you boiled the DME with water, and chilled, then there's no problem. Old DME may not taste especially great, but it still has all the sugars and free amino nitrogen that the yeast need, and i …
answered Mar 29 '12 by mdma
4
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A dry sachet contains about 200 billion cells when new, with a decrease of around 4% per month thereafer. For a beer in the 1.070 range, recommended pitching rates are 1-1.5 million cells / ml / 4 SG …
answered Sep 13 '12 by mdma
6
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A short starter is fine. I often have starters that begin stirring when I start the brewday, so they're only going for 8-10 hours max. With appropriate handling, the risk of contamination can be mitig …
answered Nov 18 '12 by mdma
2
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I've also bought those foam stoppers, and most times I've used them I've ended up with contaimation of the starter. It may be because I make my starters 5-7 days ahead of brewday - it seems that once …
answered Jan 27 '12 by mdma
2
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The yeast cake is the name given to the body of yeast at the bottom of the fermentor that's left behind after racking off your beer.
answered Mar 21 '13 by mdma
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Sure, dilute it, boil it to get about 1.040 SG and use it in the starter. All of the sugar content is still there. It may have staled and developed soapy compounds but the yeast don't care about those …
answered Jun 5 '13 by mdma
5
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If the starter was not hopped, you should be ok since the hops are needed to produce the skunky flavors. The UV radiation in sunlight can damage yeast cells, but they are capable of self-repair to a …
answered Jan 12 '14 by mdma
7
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The point of a stirplate is to help the yeast propagate by aerating the wort. Yeast Propagation and Maintainance claim stirring can increase yeast cell count by 10-15 times, compared to simply using a …
answered Feb 14 '12 by mdma
2
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While starters ideally don't make use of an airlock to promote maximum O2 exchange, some people prefer to use an airlock to counter wild yeasts and other contaminants. The narrow neck on the conical f …
answered May 6 '13 by mdma
3
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With a starter that large, it's best to pour off the starter wort. To do this, you can either leave it for a few days for the yeast to settle out, or put the starter in the fridge a few hours before …
answered Sep 23 '12 by mdma
2
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Servomyces is simply dead yeast. Prior to being killed, it was fed micronutrients which have been stored in the yeast. There's no harm pitching more into your starter, assuming you then later pitch to …
answered Sep 25 '12 by mdma
4
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You don't need a starter since you're pitching to 1/4 batch size that a whitelabs vial is good for. Normally you'd use 2-4 vials for a 20 liter batch, depending upon gravity, so that's equivalent to 1 …
answered Jan 4 '14 by mdma

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