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Female flower cones from the Humulus lupulus plant. Used for their flavor, aroma, and bittering qualities. Hops may also contribute a preservative/anti-microbial properties to beer.

11
votes
I compost mine, and they break down just as easily as most other vegetable matter that gets thrown on the pile. I'm normally adding a few ounces of hop material at most to a compost pile that's fu …
answered Apr 14 '11 by baka
7
votes
I would try furnace filters and a box fan (~2:40). You probably want to avoid a normal food dehydrator, because most of them use heat as well as moving air, so whatever you're drying winds up gettin …
answered Sep 6 '11 by baka
0
votes
You could make two teas with equal volumes of water and equal mass of wormwood & hops in each one, and compare the bitterness levels. Try and get some other people to compare them as well, if you … have willing tasters around. You may have to make a few batches to really get it figured out. If you have a few different types of hops, you could make several batches, so you could have a better …
answered Jan 26 '11 by baka
2
votes
Vinnie Cilurzo does (did) it, for whatever that's worth. From that article, it sounds as though the point is to keep a "big", fresh hop aroma, while removing most of the "bits" before they can contr …
answered Apr 13 '11 by baka
5
votes
profiles. Hops pretty obviously doesn't contain anything that breaks down to what drug tests check for, just based on the lack of people losing jobs and "breaking" parole for drinking some beer. Your … friend may be thinking of the effects of 2-Methyl-2-butanol, which is what gives Hops their sedative properties. *I am not a biologitician. …
answered Aug 29 '11 by baka
8
votes
I've heard that as well, and seen it mentioned by several sources. According to wikipedia, it causes hyperthermia in dogs.
answered May 27 '11 by baka
3
votes
1answer
I've got about 3oz of cascade hops that spent 2 years in the freezer before I decided around January 2011 to take them out, put them in a paper bag, and let them sit at room temperature to age so I …
asked Sep 25 '11 by baka
0
votes
I recently brewed a "Belgian" IPA where I used a combination of US Saaz, US Fuggles, and Mt. Hood, which managed to create a very nice citrusy flavor (Orange juice, actually). So don't forget that combinations of hops can produce new, unexpected flavors. …
answered Apr 27 '11 by baka
7
votes
Typically, the long boil is intended to increase melanoidin formation ("kettle carmelization") and decrease DMS in wort with a lot of pilsener malt. The former appears to be the case, here: "W …
answered Dec 27 '10 by baka
2
votes
hops in the main boil. The proteins in the boiling wort coagulate around some of the hop solids and drop out of suspension, and the hop oils will coat yeast cells and flocculate out during fermentation …
answered May 27 '11 by baka