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For questions related to warm fermentation of beer with yeast comfortable near room temperature (i.e. ale yeast).

2
votes
Pumpkin leaves a ton of goo in the fermentor. It's mostly fiber, which is what makes pumpkin such a good food for you. Whatever is oozing around in the beer will undoubtedly settle down and sink to th …
answered Aug 18 '11 by Graham
8
votes
The best choice is Kolsch Yeast. White Labs: http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/strains_wlp029.html Wyeast: http://www.wyeastlab.com/rw_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=144 Only downside is 68-70 ambient temp …
answered Mar 30 '11 by Graham
5
votes
flavor will transfer into a fermented product like that. I was on a quest once to get "graham cracker" flavor into a brown ale, and while I never got the perfect flavor I was seeking, i got relatively … . http://www.rebelbrewer.com/shop/brewing-ingredients/grain/specialty-grains/grainother/briess-carabrown-by-the-pound The graham cracker flavor was very fleeting, by my recollection of that batch, but was noticeable, and my mild / brown ale with CaraBrown was once of my better batches of that style. …
answered Oct 9 '15 by Graham
5
votes
Adding pure sugar to any beer style does a few things. First, it increases the ABV. This is only an issue if it gets you an alcohol % that is noticeable in the flavor profile of the beer. Brown Ale
answered Nov 28 '12 by Graham
2
votes
I would actually encourage you to HOLD UP on changing the yeast. First of all, you didn't indicate what yeast you actually used. I'm assuming its a neutral ale yeast (US-05, Nottingham, Muntons, etc … ) because you really don't want a ton of yeast flavor in a Rye Pale Ale. That style highlights the weird spicy flavor of the rye along with a nice hop wallop, and adding in a strong yeast flavor …
answered Jan 27 '15 by Graham