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The process of moving beer or wine in to bottles and sealing them for later consumption.

5
votes
Green beer bottles lead to light contamination, in my experience. I do not recommend you use green bottles. If you want bottles with bale stoppers, you can buy them, although they are expensive in c …
answered Feb 3 '10 by TinCoyote
18
votes
There is nothing wrong with using carbonation drops. There are some advantages. They give you a very consistent carbonation from bottle to bottle. Uneven priming sugar mix in the bottling bucket …
answered Jan 14 '11 by TinCoyote
8
votes
final gravity number, so you can know what you are shooting for. Unless its a big beer, I usually wait until the gravity is under 1.015 before bottling for a standard ale yeast. If you are getting … uneven carbonation, meaning some bottles that explode or gush, or some that are under-carbed, then you are not mixing the priming sugar in thoroughly enough in the bottling bucket. I created an …
answered Apr 2 '10 by TinCoyote
6
votes
The general rule is as long as a beer doesn't smell or taste off, it's probably okay to drink. It sounds to me like you have a Lactobacillus infection. Lacto will give the beer a sour taste and that …
answered Mar 22 '11 by TinCoyote