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A fermented beverage where the majority of the fermentable sugars are derived from malted grains via mashing.

28
votes
interesting spruce tip beer. Juniper berries can also be used. You could do a wit-like beer with coriander, orange peel and pinch of chamomile for aroma additions. Maybe focus on yeast estery styles …
answered Nov 15 '10 by Morgan
5
votes
) water has a higher alkalinity. Using water high in bicarbonates to make a pale beer such as Pilsner will yield a 'harsh' bitterness. This type of water tends to favor dark beers made with roasted …
answered Nov 10 '10 by Morgan
12
votes
First, make an appropriately sized starter! Pitching a regular old vial into something like a 1.090 beer is a good way to overstress the yeast and get lots of undesirable esters, and have a beer that … alcohol. Third, make sure your aeration step is solid. Your beer will need to be well aerated to ferment out completely. …
answered Nov 14 '10 by Morgan
3
votes
The formula to determine wattage is as follows: Gallons * Temp Rise (F) ------------------------------------ * 1000 = Watts Required 372 * heat up time (hours) So, for a homebrew example of 7 gallo …
answered Nov 16 '10 by Morgan
6
votes
Most things will scale just fine linearly, the exception being hop utilization. Wort gravity has an effect on utilization; the higher the gravity the lower the utilization. This is why extract brewer …
answered Nov 14 '10 by Morgan
2
votes
No, but I'm fascinated. The writeup you linked to seems pretty comprehensive. It does seem like a really nice way to get the benefits of a decoction while saving yourself the labor involved in a d …
answered Nov 13 '10 by Morgan
3
votes
It's pretty common to split. There are upsides: it allows you to experiment with different yeast temperatures, pitching rates, and dry hop additions. If you want to go with one big fermenter, then y …
answered Nov 13 '10 by Morgan
3
votes
, and thus will have 'extra' to convert the wheat starches. This is one reason why you'll see a base barley malt, either 2-row or 6-row, in any wheat beer all-grain recipe. The caramel and chocolate …
answered Nov 11 '10 by Morgan
7
votes
There is satisfaction, and frustration, in growing hops. I personally have 6 hop varieties growing. Problems: variable yields. Your local weather will have a huge effect on what variety you can g …
answered Nov 10 '10 by Morgan
5
votes
You can reuse it, yes. As PMV said, it's usually ideal for a larger batch. The downside of this is that often this yeast cake will have lots of hops and other trub intermixed within, which can be ve …
answered Nov 9 '10 by Morgan
27
votes
Personally I compost it most of the time. I have used it to make bread, and pizza crust. Typically i just grab maybe 2 cups of it while it's still wet and fresh from the mash, then add the typical i …
answered Nov 11 '10 by Morgan
5
votes
For most things I just use my trusty stick, otherwise known as a thin dowel from the hardware store. Pour one gallon into your pot, stand stick in pot, note water line, and mark with a sharpie or oth …
answered Nov 15 '10 by Morgan
6
votes
hops; 9# dry in 5 gallons would bump it to 1.086 OG. Dry and liquid malt extract are NOT interchangeable 1-to-1) Assuming you finished around 1.018, you should have a 7.7% beer. If you say it's only 7 …
answered Nov 13 '10 by Morgan