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A fermented beverage where the majority of the fermentable sugars are derived from malted grains via mashing.

1
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If you live in a very small city studio flat then this may be the way for you, very little space is taken up and it all come very neatly packaged. But... if you want to make your own beer recipes …
answered Jul 11 '16 by Mr_road
1
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Quick check and you should get 1048 if you drop it all in a 5gallon about 25l batch. Would seem a reasonable gravity. Please report back on how it brews up.
answered Feb 4 '17 by Mr_road
2
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note deliciousness of final product. Saying all that, unless your beer smells undrinkable or tastes undrinkable, then it usually is drinkable. If you could provide the recipe you used with volumes … and quantities that would be very helpful for us to be able to provide you with more advice. Also a picture of the FV and your beer can never hurt. All that is left for me to say is welcome to the world of brewing and go buy a hydrometer they are very useful :) …
answered May 10 '18 by Mr_road
3
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You can substitute any bitter herb for hops if you wish. Also given the fact it has anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties, it will likely protect your brew from biological contamination, as hop al …
answered May 14 '18 by Mr_road
2
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So you are moving from a 40l kit to 160l kit. Things I would be considering: 1) How am I going to move around 150Kg of water? 2) What am I going to do with huge amounts of spent grain? 3) What effe …
answered Oct 14 '16 by Mr_road
4
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Looks fine, rack to secondary and grab a bit to taste if it tastes fine then you have most likely avoided any significant bacterial contamination. Smell first, if it smells off don't taste it. Taste …
answered Oct 27 '16 by Mr_road
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It is dried yeast, it will be fine. You should how ever allow it to warm to room temperature before adding it to your wort. And, you should probably look at how to rehydrate it before pitching or m …
answered Apr 11 '16 by Mr_road
0
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Dry hopping has a chance of introducing the bacteria that have formed this film, but does not itself cause it. If the brew is still tasting good, keg it and drink it, so long as you have alcohol in th …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Mr_road
5
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Once you have cold crashed there will still be enough yeast to carb up your beer, given enough time. I suggest leaving your beers in primary for your usual amount of time, but racking to secondary …
answered Apr 13 '18 by Mr_road
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If I am going for a sweet Ginger Beer then I use a low attenuating Ale yeast such as S04, for a drier Ginger Ale I tend to use a wine yeast, and allow it a few days longer to ferment out more of the …
answered May 12 '15 by Mr_road
2
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DADY can get down to 997 it you use mash temperature that result in fewer branched saccharides, it can produce higher levels of Fusel Alcohols that most beer yeasts. This is not much of an issue for … distillers as they are about to purify their product by distillation, but can affect flavour of your beer. I see in one of your answers you did a comparision yourself between SO4, S05 and DADY. The …
answered Feb 5 '18 by Mr_road
2
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If you are looking to cook with it you could try making something akin to a Flemish stew, this usually calls for a darker sour beer, but I imagine it could work well with a sour Saison. Just don't …
answered Jul 11 '18 by Mr_road
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You do not need beer yeast to make beer. If you are using bread yeast try to keep the temperature down. But. If you are trying to recreate a given style then having the correct yeast is very … important. A large amount of the flavour of the beer comes from the yeast you use. Also, a large amount of how well the yeast makes the flavours is from how warm the yeast gets. If you can keep the …
answered Oct 25 '18 by Mr_road
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Use a lower attenuating yeast would be my first suggestion; leaving more sugar for you to taste. What yeast are you currently brewing with?
answered Feb 29 '16 by Mr_road
0
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Does it: A) Look like beer? B) Smell Like Beer? C) Taste like beer? If the answer to A and B is NO, then don't taste it, if the answer to all if Yes then you are good to go. …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Mr_road

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