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Hi typically use liquid and dried malt extracts and add hops. For the first time i am also going to steep some grains. I am making 23l english best bitter and have bought all the standard ingrdients for that style.

My problem is i don't have an exact recipe and have no idea on typical ratio of grain to water when steeping (will use large stewing pot). I am just looking for rough guidance, this brew is experimental anyway.

Kg/litre or lbs/gal, exact or ranges, gratefully accepted. Hints and tips also welcome.

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    Post your ingredient list and disired final volume. We can then assist more. – Evil Zymurgist May 28 '18 at 16:28
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Grain absorbs approx 1 litre per 1 kg, that's the only hard-and-fast rule, everything else depends on recipe and on what you're trying to achieve.

Do I understand right that your fermentable base is still going to be liquid/dry extract, and you're gonna steep just specialty malts? If so you can steep maybe 1 kg crystal in ~4 litres of 65C water for ~30 minutes (there's no enzymatic activity here, it's just like tea making), then strain and add that liquid to the wort based on extract malt. For more exact proportions refer to recipes appropriate to the style.

If by "steeping" you mean actually mashing the base and specialty malt altogether, then the answer is going to be so big that I'd recommend you read some literature on this, like Palmer's "How To Brew" - last time I checked some version of it was available at howtobrew.com

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  • Thanks that's really useful and what i was after. I actually didn't see your answer in time, and did the brew last night. The quantities i used were 250g crystal medium 250g caramunich 2l water at 75deg for 30 minutes. Seemed to work well, smelt good. So quantity aligns with your guidance. – Mark Kortink May 30 '18 at 2:24

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