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What specific steps do I have to follow to produce crystal clear homebrew?

  • all grain or extract brew? – barking.pete Nov 24 '17 at 18:43
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1. Use lower protein malt - Lower protein malts make less haze since the haze is caused by proteins.

2. Use Whirlfloc tablets - Whirlfloc tablets are a blend of Irish Moss and purified Kappa carrageenan that encourages the precipitation of haze causing materials such as proteins and Beta glucans. Add for the final 5 minutes of the boil.

3. Cool your Wort Quickly - Use an immersion or counter-flow chiller to cool your beer as quickly as possible.

4. Choose a Yeast High in Flocculation - Flocculation is defined simply as the rate at which a particular yeast strain will fall out of the beer once fermentation is complete.

5. Cold Crash your beer - This helps to coagulate proteins and make other solids fall quickly to the bottom of your secondary.

6. Use Gelatin before you keg or bottle - Gelatin or other fining agents will dramatically assist in giving you a clearer beer.

7. Lager your beer - Storing your beer for a long time in cold conditions will make most haze settle to the bottom of your keg or bottles.

8. Use a filter - when all else fails, the best way to get a clear beer is to use a filter.

  • At what step can I filter? – Jonas Nov 23 '17 at 21:31
  • You actually forgot one: pour careful, esp. when bottle carbonating. – chthon Nov 24 '17 at 6:35
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    @Jonas filter before you keg, if you bottle condition, it may take a long time to carbonate, if it does at all. – jsolarski Nov 24 '17 at 15:00
  • @Jonas after fermentation is done and before you carbonate. You might want to settle the beer for a while so you don't clog the filters up. I would only do this if you are kegging a beer. As was mentioned, if you filter it will be hard to bottle carbonate. – farmersteve Nov 24 '17 at 15:22
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    No. 7 is, IMHO, easiest. 1/2 teaspoon of gelatin powder in half a liter of cool water. Dissolve by shaking well for a couple of minutes before SPRINKLING on the surface of your wort. Do this after fermentation is complete, and wait four days or more before racking to bottling bucket. Result, crystal clear beers! – Peter Cotton Nov 29 '17 at 10:13

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