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I'm planning to use recycled Corona bottles to pack some juice I'm producing, but to put my own logo on these bottles, I want to remove the original printed brand. In my city, and even in my whole country there is no recycling plants so there is basically nowhere to get help.

I tried using paint thinner, paint remover, acetone, and brushing, only the last one worked but the bottle was unsuable after that.

So, the question: HOW TO REMOVE THE PRINTED BRANDING IN A CORONA BOTTLE?

corona bottle to be cleaned

  • Not sure how, but did you consider painting over it? – Philippe Jul 8 '17 at 0:32
  • I didn't, now I do, but I didn't give up... yet. – Fahed Jul 8 '17 at 1:12
  • I won't post an answer because I've never tried myself, but I've seen people using Star San or any other low pH acid to remove such screen printed labels. Again, other brands not Corona. – rondonctba Jul 8 '17 at 3:41
  • Ok, thanks for the idea, I'll look forma forma an alternetive, since Star San is not available where I live. – Fahed Jul 8 '17 at 4:58
  • If you live in a sunny country then a clear bottle may present some possibility of "skunking" the beer if exposed to sunlight. IMHO it is not a very big problem but might tip the balance against using Corona bottles. It would be better to use a brown or green bottle if much cleaning effort is involved. If you intend to drink you r beer within 3 months of bottling then you may be better off using plastic bottles, the type used for fizzy drinks. They will generally hold carbonation pressure for 6 months or longer but can loose pressure over a year. – barking.pete Jul 8 '17 at 10:53
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Soak in StarSan.

Mix starsan as you would normally. Submerge bottles and soak for a day or so. Use a stainless steel scrubber (ball of stainless steel for cleaning pots/pans) to scrub off the paint.

I've done this on 100's of bottles. It's really effortless with the scrubber.

Side note I wouldn't recommend clear bottles for beer or anything hopped. (skunking from light) But they do work good for ciders and the like.

  • good to know the is a way :-) Do you know what generic product could be an alternative t StarSan? becuase I don't live in USA. – Fahed Jul 8 '17 at 19:29
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    You may be able to make an acidic soap with dish soap and a use hydrochloric acid to drop the pH to 3.0. This should soften the paint but I've not tried this. – Evil Zymurgist Jul 10 '17 at 1:22
  • would it make a difference if I use just hydrochloric acid, what is the soap for? – Fahed Jul 10 '17 at 15:42
  • @FahedFahed I've heard that the non foaming version of starsan doesn't work as well for paint. The soap should simulate the foaming. This is just hearsay and speculations though. – Evil Zymurgist Jul 10 '17 at 16:44
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This would be the final answer for me, but I left Evil Zymurgist's answer as accepted since he pointed me in the right direction.

I just wanted to let you know, in case anyone else could find this useful.

Hydrochloric acid alone worked perfectly, the bottle was put into it for less than 20 minutes, and after that it was rinsed with water (almost no rubbing was needed) and everything was removed in less than 10 seconds.

NOTES:

-The part of paint remaining on the top, was not inside the acid.

-The bottle itself was not affected. It's still shiny and without a single scratch after the proccess.

-The paint doesn't disintegrate inside the acid, so the acid could be used multiple times.

-You should use protective equipment. And NEVER EVER mix the acid with bleach... it could kill you (literally).

You can see the result here:

enter image description here

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