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We have just made our first brew - an all grain pale ale. As per recipe we left it fermenting for a week, syphoned into a separate bucket, adding the priming sugar and then bottled. The beer is cloudy!! Would like to know why this might be and if the brew will be safe to drink after conditioning?? Thanks 🤞

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    Please edit your question and include more details, e.g., the recipe, and the how you treated the beer, e.g., did you cold crash, filter, or anything like that? – Robert Jun 11 '17 at 20:10
  • Please provide a picture. It is most likely yeast still is suspension. If it doesn't clear just tell everyone you were aiming for a New England style haze :) – Mr_road Jun 14 '17 at 19:31
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Only a week fermentation and still cloudy. Typical of still having yeast in suspension.

Let the bottles condition, then cold crash in the bottle. After a few days on chill your beer should be clear. Just don't stir up dregs when pouring.

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    Two weeks conditioning in a room at least 18° C, preferably 20-22°C. – chthon Jun 12 '17 at 9:31
  • As for cold crashing and dregs, I noticed that the yeast sticks better to the bottom of the bottle after doing this. You still have to be a little bit careful, but it does not come off the bottom as easily. When pouring your beer start easy, after you poured out the first half rotate your bottle with your hand 180 degrees then carefully pour the rest. – chthon Jun 12 '17 at 9:35
  • Leaving the beer sit in the secondary for a week or two would have given you better clarity, but as mentionned by EZ, it will be done directly in the bottle. But be very careful not to shake your bottles prior to opening. – Philippe Jun 13 '17 at 13:05
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You sound new to this so:

  1. How do you know your beer was finished in the primary? 1 week with a yeast you don't know may not have been enough time.
  2. If your beer was not finished you may have just created a ticking time bomb with those bottles, if so this is VERY DANGEROUS. There have been many folks permanently hurt with bottle bombs, glass flies everywhere when they explode. Open one up a few days after bottling and if it foams all over the place it likely means this is actually dangerous.

Expecting commercial clarity from homebrew without knowing your recipe or the yeast you used would not be a reasonable expectation. Some yeast will drop completely clear, some don't, and some are in between. Combine that with ingredients that can haze the beer and you have a rather complex set of variables.

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  • Thanks for your answers, yes we are completely new to this! Will take a picture of the recipe and post it later. – Jared Salisbury Jun 12 '17 at 14:26
  • I've just opened one and there was a lovely little hiss and that was it thank god!! Having done some research it appears we did quite a few things wrong during the brew so am looking forward to the next time and doing things differently! Thanks again for the tips 😃 – Jared Salisbury Jun 13 '17 at 16:44
  • It's a great thing to brew your own beer, and even better if you like it. Doing things wrong or maybe not quite right somehow adds to the adventure. Hope you enjoyed the beer! – Pale Ale Jun 13 '17 at 19:19
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I've just opened one and there was a lovely little hiss and that was it thank god!! Having done some research it appears we did quite a few things wrong during the brew so am looking forward to the next time and doing things differently! Thanks again for the tips 😃

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After conditioning for 2weeks at room temperature. Then put in the refrigerator for another 2week. That should help clear it up.

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