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I live in a tropical country and don't have an extra freezer, but I want to comeback to homebrewing. I'll dare to brew at high temperatures and would like to find ways to get a decent tasting beer. Here are some tips that I collected, can you give some more tips and recommendations?

Recipes

Try to brew English bitters or Belgian ales. If you like (I don't) saison is best.

Yeast Strains

Some strains support better high temps. Here is a list I collected:

  • US-05
  • White Labs WLP065 (American Whiskey Yeast) — 75-82 °F (24–28 °C)
  • White Labs WLP665 (Flemish Ale Blend) — 68-80°F (20 –27 °C)
  • Wyeast 1388 (Belgian Strong Ale) — 64-80° F (18-27° C)
  • Wyast 3725 (PC Biere de Garde) — 70-84 °F (21-29 °C)
  • Wyeast 3763 (Roeselare Ale Blend) — 65-85 °F (18-30 °C)
  • Wyeast 3822 (PC Belgian Dark Ale) — 65-80 °F (18-27 °C)
  • WLP644

Wet T-Shit Cooling

Cool it with a wet t-shirt over your fermenter, put it over an bowl with some ice, water and salt, and use a fan to accelerate the evaporation. It will get some degrees down.

During fermentation, the temp of the wort will be 5-8 degrees higher than the ambient temp.

Process

Chill your wort till room temperature.

Leave a couple of weeks maturing after the 2-3 days of initial fermentation. Also more time in the bottle.

Here the main 2 pages where I gathered this info:

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    Chlorine? Don't you mean salt? Ice salt water will be lower temperature than regular ice water. I don't think I'd want to get chlorine anywhere near my beer! (and as described would probably be dangerous) – winwaed Apr 18 '17 at 18:07
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I advise looking at HotHead from Omega Labs: http://www.omegayeast.com/portfolio/14158-2/

  • Flocculation: Medium-High
  • Attenuation: 75-85%
  • Temperature Range: 62-98° F (16-37° C)
  • Alcohol Tolerance: 11% ABV
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I don't live in a tropical climate, but summers here get quite hot (chicago IL)

during the summer I use a Large rubbermade Tote, and fill it with water and put my fermentation buckets into it. it keeps my temperature stable around 70F, and if I need to get it to a lower temp, I add Ice, or frozen water bottles to it.

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    Good one! Evaporation may lower the temperature a few degrees indeed. This may actually be an ideal choice for my situation: Holland, I have my stuff under the roof, it's isolated and the temperature are normally around 10-15°C (50-59°F) in the summer if may raise up to 20ish (68F) whit only a few days were it may reach 30 (86) or more. I could easily put the carboys into a bucket with water these few days. – runlevel0 Apr 21 '17 at 8:12

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