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Have made a couple of beers with Belle Saison yeast and have seen a couple of posts about this and other belgian yeast producing funky flavor. After having tasted my own beer I have to agree, there is differently a flavor that I can not define as anything else than funk. I'm not yet certain if I dislike it or actualy like it but I do lik that the beer gets dryer. In any case two questions:

Does anybody know what this flavor comes from?

Will it develop on the bottle and if so how?

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That is somewhat the desired outcome for a Belgian yeast to do. The amount of "funk" is always up to each individual. I have used this particular strain to make Saison and Witbier styles with good results, although each of these styles in my opinion are at the low end of funky Belgian styles. The temperature of fermentation, cleanliness, grain bill, all play a part in the flavor profile. Compare some Belgian beers off the shelf to yours and see if you see some similarities and take note of the differences. You may have an infected beer combined with the Belgian profile.

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  • I have made one saison that I do not think had an infection with belle. That one was good. The last ones I decided to experiment with and used only pilsner malt in one and pale malt in the other. They are maby a bit to dry, and two of the bottles definitely did have an infection (sour). I wil give the one I have now some more time. I do appreciate the fact that I can make beer in my apartment without freezing my ass off with this yeast or get an estery mess. – ElvishPriestley Mar 14 '17 at 22:31
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I'm not entirely certain if I have an answer to what it is that generates the funk taste.

Belle Saison yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae according to a datasheet I found on it. I did not see any flavor compounds for this on Wikipedia. But for Brettanomyces 3 sensory compounds are listed with taste impact:

4-ethylphenol: Band-aids, barnyard, horse stable, antiseptic

4-ethylguaiacol: Bacon, spice, cloves, smoky

isovaleric acid: Sweaty saddle, cheese, rancidity

I'm thinking now that perhaps belle either generate 4-ethylphenol or isovaleric acid or both perhaps some 4-ethylguaiacol to. Barnyard/horse is something I can identify in the aroma but not antiseptic or band-aids

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