1

After reading some reviews online I'm most definitely sure the malt extract is no good, I was wondering if the yeast would be any good (just curious).

8

17 year old dried yeast? Which costs maybe $5 new? And is the most critical factor in the production of beer? (Brewers make wort, yeast make beer).

Replace it.

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  • I agree, replace it, by friend did the same thing, don't use those ingredients, leads to undrinkable beer and disappointment. – jsolarski May 10 '16 at 4:06
  • Agreed, replace it. – Mr_road May 10 '16 at 7:58
  • 1
    Or give it a shot and call it Necromancer's Undead Ale ;) – Jarrod Smith May 10 '16 at 23:02
  • Dried yeast should be quite resilient. Why not try nurishing it, and see if it is still alive? Then make an undead ale like @Jarrod Smith said ^^ – DJHellduck May 16 '16 at 15:22
1

That's old. Its' ingredients are toast for a drinkable beer. Yeast is dead for sure. Hops will have nothing to offer either.

But the extract you can still make use of for yeast starters, just crash and decant the beer off. But still wouldn't be as good as using fresh DME.

The hardware should be fine, just check the plastics for cracks etc.

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-1

Yeast isnt so much the worry, its the extract and grains. Ive brewed with LME's that have sat on the shelf for a year or so and it leads to a very unpleasant cardboard taste and thats the nice way to describe it.

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  • Actually, yeast is the first thing to replace. Stale extract will taste unpleasant, but will work. Stale hops will still somewhat bitter. Dead yeast will do nothing and lack of fermentation will let wort to rot. – Mołot May 14 '16 at 6:08

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