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I'll be bottling my first batch of beer next week. I'm curious about the logistics of this given the equipment I have. The 5 g batch is currently in the primary fermentation bucket. I planned to skip the secondary fermentation in a carboy due to all the advise I've read.

How do I mix in the priming sugar on bottling day?

Do I rack the beer out of the primary into small bottling bucket I have (only about 2 gallons in size). Once in the small bottling bucket I could mix in the reduced amount of priming sugar. Then repeat this a few times.

Or do I rack to a larger 5 g bucket/carboy with no spigot, and mix in the priming sugar at at once. Then just siphon out into the bottles.

Or I could mix the sugar directly into the primary, which seems like it would end up mixing in a lot of the sediment at the bottom.

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"Or do I rack to a larger 5 g bucket/carboy with no spigot, and mix in the priming sugar at at once. Then just siphon out into the bottles." Given the equipment that you have and your objectives, this is the best option.

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It would be advisable not to try to mix the sugar multiple times in the 2 gallon bottling bucket because you will end up with slightly different results for the three times you bottled out of that bucket. I think you would be best off putting the brew in the 5 gallon carboy with the priming sugar, and then siphon into the bottling bucket, that way you can use the spigot to fill your bottles since that will be much easier than just directly siphoning into the bottles.

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Adding the priming sugar to the primary and rousing it gently should be ok as long as the yeast is finished and has clumped together. It should settle back out within a few hours. I know when my local pub did a brewing course this was how the guy running it did his.

Of course in order to get maximum clarity moving it over to a secondary would be better but if you are desperate to keep everything in the primary this might work for you.

Also you should probably use a priming sugar solution rather than just adding sugar directly, that will give you a better distribution of sugar and reduce the mixing required.

I guess this does depend on the flocculation of the yeast you are using.

Jacob.

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