3 added 33 characters in body
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My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2CO2 + H2OH2O <=> HCO3H2CO3 <=> HCO3- + H+

It's not a particular strong acid since it's pKa is in the 6's but it is particularly important in animal physiology.

My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2 + H2O <=> HCO3- + H+

My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2 + H2O <=> H2CO3 <=> HCO3- + H+

It's not a particular strong acid since it's pKa is in the 6's but it is particularly important in animal physiology.

2 deleted 16 characters in body
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My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2 + H2O <=> HCO3<superscript>-</superscript> + H+

(Obviously, I also need to learn out how to get proper formatting of chemical notation on Homebrew answers.) CO2 + H2O <=> HCO3- + H+

My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2 + H2O <=> HCO3<superscript>-</superscript> + H+

(Obviously, I also need to learn out how to get proper formatting of chemical notation on Homebrew answers.)

My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2 + H2O <=> HCO3- + H+

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My experience, probably less extensive than many of the respondents here, is that longer shaking and repeated shaking is needed. It's not just an issue of getting the CO2 to dissolve but rather the formation of carbonic acid needs to take place. That's not a rapid reaction. It's probably one that the presence of yeast might make more rapid, assuming that yeast has outward facing carbonic anhydrase, a fact that I have not yet been able to document. The reaction is:

CO2 + H2O <=> HCO3<superscript>-</superscript> + H+

(Obviously, I also need to learn out how to get proper formatting of chemical notation on Homebrew answers.)