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Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while theand don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.

  • Wet the caps. Bottle caps should be pulled from submergensubmerged in a sanitizer withwithat least 90% water, or sprayed before going on the bottle. O2 absorbing caps require water to activate and it changes the media to make a good seal. Inverting bottles capped with dry caps doesn't wet the sealing area, so it's not enough.

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while the don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.

  • Wet the caps. Bottle caps should be pulled from submergen in a sanitizer with 90% water, or sprayed before going on the bottle. O2 absorbing caps require water to activate and it changes the media to make a good seal. Inverting bottles capped with dry caps doesn't wet the sealing area, so it's not enough.

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while and don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.

  • Wet the caps. Bottle caps should be pulled from submerged in a sanitizer withat least 90% water, or sprayed before going on the bottle. O2 absorbing caps require water to activate and it changes the media to make a good seal. Inverting bottles capped with dry caps doesn't wet the sealing area, so it's not enough.

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source | link

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while the don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.

  • Wet the caps. Bottle caps should be pulled from submergen in a sanitizer with 90% water, or sprayed before going on the bottle. O2 absorbing caps require water to activate and it changes the media to make a good seal. Inverting bottles capped with dry caps doesn't wet the sealing area, so it's not enough.

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while the don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while the don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.

  • Wet the caps. Bottle caps should be pulled from submergen in a sanitizer with 90% water, or sprayed before going on the bottle. O2 absorbing caps require water to activate and it changes the media to make a good seal. Inverting bottles capped with dry caps doesn't wet the sealing area, so it's not enough.

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source | link

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG.

For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar.

Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and possible injury. Try to apply best practices for bottle conditioning.

  • rack to a bottling vessel from fermentor, this allows you to get mostly fined beer and then able to control how much trub you bring in. In 5 gallons I would intentionally bring in about 100m l of the yeast trub and mix.

  • use a powdered monosaccaride priming sugar (corn sugar), mix well in your bottling vessel.

  • repitch fresh yeast at bottling, if there was extreme fining or extended time in fermentation that would significantly reduce yeast health.

  • make sure your caps are sealing well. Cappers fatigue after a while the don't crimp very tight. Test by seeing if you can spin a cap on a capped bottle without tearing flesh on your hand. They shouldn't turn even by the strongest of us.

  • swing cap seals, these too can wear out or cause gas off from cracks or chemical damage. Some sanitizers can degrade the seal and cause it to become pourus allowing small molecule gasses to escape. When this happens they can even function like a regulator and only leak at certian a psi. So they still maintain some pressure but not as much as they should.