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According to this question's answer, from Denny Conn,

You don't pretreat the water because it's the mash pH you're concerned with, not the water pH.

And this agrees with this article on the power of pH,

Malted barley contains phosphates, which are acidic buffers. Making a mash of grain mixed with water will cause the phosphate buffers to achieve a natural pH of around 5.6. Therefore, it does not matter what the initial pH of your brewing water is because the interaction between ions in water and buffering components of the malt will always change the water pH.

But in this Gose recipe by Gordon Strong

On brew day, prepare your ingredients; mill the grain, measure your hops, and prepare your water. This recipe uses reverse osmosis (RO) water. Add 1⁄4 tsp. 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons (19 L) of brewing water, or until water measures pH 5.5 at room temperature. Add 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash.

Is this because he's using RO water? If it doesn't matter, as the second article states, why is this step here?

According to this fast souring article,

After your saccharification rest is complete, reduce the pH of the wort to 4.5 by addition of food grade lactic or phosphoric acid.

So what I'm gathering from all this is that you treat your mash to be between 5.2 and 5.5 for the purpose of ensuring the mash converts efficiently, and you treat your wort, post mash, to make it more friendly to your lacto inoculation (although, this is not specifically in Gordon's recipe).

  1. Does this sound correct, and if so, is Gordon's recommendation to treat the water incorrect, or does it have to do with the RO water?
  2. For a sour, would you treat the wort pH post mash or post sparge? Or does it matter at that point?

If it matters, I am batch sparging.

According to this question's answer, from Denny Conn,

You don't pretreat the water because it's the mash pH you're concerned with, not the water pH.

And this agrees with this article on the power of pH,

Malted barley contains phosphates, which are acidic buffers. Making a mash of grain mixed with water will cause the phosphate buffers to achieve a natural pH of around 5.6. Therefore, it does not matter what the initial pH of your brewing water is because the interaction between ions in water and buffering components of the malt will always change the water pH.

But in this Gose recipe by Gordon Strong

On brew day, prepare your ingredients; mill the grain, measure your hops, and prepare your water. This recipe uses reverse osmosis (RO) water. Add 1⁄4 tsp. 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons (19 L) of brewing water, or until water measures pH 5.5 at room temperature. Add 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash.

Is this because he's using RO water? If it doesn't matter, as the second article states, why is this step here?

According to this fast souring article,

After your saccharification rest is complete, reduce the pH of the wort to 4.5 by addition of food grade lactic or phosphoric acid.

So what I'm gathering from all this is that you treat your mash to be between 5.2 and 5.5 for the purpose of ensuring the mash converts efficiently, and you treat your wort, post mash, to make it more friendly to your lacto inoculation (although, this is not specifically in Gordon's recipe).

  1. Does this sound correct, and if so, is Gordon's recommendation to treat the water incorrect, or does it have to do with the RO water?
  2. For a sour, would you treat the wort pH post mash or post sparge? Or does it matter at that point?

If it matters, I am batch sparging.

According to this question's answer, from Denny Conn,

You don't pretreat the water because it's the mash pH you're concerned with, not the water pH.

And this agrees with this article on the power of pH,

Malted barley contains phosphates, which are acidic buffers. Making a mash of grain mixed with water will cause the phosphate buffers to achieve a natural pH of around 5.6. Therefore, it does not matter what the initial pH of your brewing water is because the interaction between ions in water and buffering components of the malt will always change the water pH.

But in this Gose recipe by Gordon Strong

On brew day, prepare your ingredients; mill the grain, measure your hops, and prepare your water. This recipe uses reverse osmosis (RO) water. Add 1⁄4 tsp. 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons (19 L) of brewing water, or until water measures pH 5.5 at room temperature. Add 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash.

According to this fast souring article,

After your saccharification rest is complete, reduce the pH of the wort to 4.5 by addition of food grade lactic or phosphoric acid.

So what I'm gathering from all this is that you treat your mash to be between 5.2 and 5.5 for the purpose of ensuring the mash converts efficiently, and you treat your wort, post mash, to make it more friendly to your lacto inoculation (although, this is not specifically in Gordon's recipe).

  1. Does this sound correct, and if so, is Gordon's recommendation to treat the water incorrect, or does it have to do with the RO water?
  2. For a sour, would you treat the wort pH post mash or post sparge? Or does it matter at that point?

If it matters, I am batch sparging.

1
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When should you treat your water for pH for a sour beer?

According to this question's answer, from Denny Conn,

You don't pretreat the water because it's the mash pH you're concerned with, not the water pH.

And this agrees with this article on the power of pH,

Malted barley contains phosphates, which are acidic buffers. Making a mash of grain mixed with water will cause the phosphate buffers to achieve a natural pH of around 5.6. Therefore, it does not matter what the initial pH of your brewing water is because the interaction between ions in water and buffering components of the malt will always change the water pH.

But in this Gose recipe by Gordon Strong

On brew day, prepare your ingredients; mill the grain, measure your hops, and prepare your water. This recipe uses reverse osmosis (RO) water. Add 1⁄4 tsp. 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons (19 L) of brewing water, or until water measures pH 5.5 at room temperature. Add 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash.

Is this because he's using RO water? If it doesn't matter, as the second article states, why is this step here?

According to this fast souring article,

After your saccharification rest is complete, reduce the pH of the wort to 4.5 by addition of food grade lactic or phosphoric acid.

So what I'm gathering from all this is that you treat your mash to be between 5.2 and 5.5 for the purpose of ensuring the mash converts efficiently, and you treat your wort, post mash, to make it more friendly to your lacto inoculation (although, this is not specifically in Gordon's recipe).

  1. Does this sound correct, and if so, is Gordon's recommendation to treat the water incorrect, or does it have to do with the RO water?
  2. For a sour, would you treat the wort pH post mash or post sparge? Or does it matter at that point?

If it matters, I am batch sparging.