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So you have about 1kg of table sugar, and about 60g of fructose from the pineapple in a total of 5 liters of water. That should put your OG at around 1.080-1.085, depending on just how much and how ripe the pineapple was.

Since it's all white sugars, we can assume that everything has the potential to ferment out completely leaving you with about 12%11-12% ABV with full attenuation.

However, you used bread yeast, which has an unknown alcohol tolerance. I know some people use dry bread yeast for meads and achieve relatively high ABVs, while others claim bread yeast have problems surpassing 5-6%. My opinion on the subject is that it'll depend on what exactly the yeast is, and we just don't know. You also didn't use nutritional supplements, which will leave your yeast in less than optimal health.

Due to the unknown nature of your yeast, your final ABV will also be unknown. Most yeast will do 5-6% without problems, but when we make beer/cider/mead up to and past ~10% we usually have to deliberately pick yeast with high alcohol tolerance to ensure we get there.

My guess would be that you reach the alcohol tolerance of your yeast, and end up with a somewhat sweet product somewhere around 6-10% ABV.

If you do something like this again, I'd suggest you use a white wine or sparkling wine yeast since it will handle the alcohol and be happier in a high sucrose+fructose environment than baking- or brewer's yeast.

So you have about 1kg of table sugar, and about 60g of fructose from the pineapple in a total of 5 liters of water. That should put your OG at around 1.080-1.085, depending on just how much and how ripe the pineapple was.

Since it's all white sugars, we can assume that everything has the potential to ferment out completely leaving you with about 12% ABV with full attenuation.

However, you used bread yeast, which has an unknown alcohol tolerance. I know some people use dry bread yeast for meads and achieve relatively high ABVs, while others claim bread yeast have problems surpassing 5-6%. My opinion on the subject is that it'll depend on what exactly the yeast is, and we just don't know. You also didn't use nutritional supplements, which will leave your yeast in less than optimal health.

Due to the unknown nature of your yeast, your final ABV will also be unknown. Most yeast will do 5-6% without problems, but when we make beer/cider/mead up to and past ~10% we usually have to deliberately pick yeast with high alcohol tolerance to ensure we get there.

My guess would be that you reach the alcohol tolerance of your yeast, and end up with a somewhat sweet product somewhere around 6-10% ABV.

If you do something like this again, I'd suggest you use a white wine or sparkling wine yeast since it will handle the alcohol and be happier in a high sucrose+fructose environment than baking- or brewer's yeast.

So you have about 1kg of table sugar, and about 60g of fructose from the pineapple in a total of 5 liters of water. That should put your OG at around 1.080-1.085, depending on just how much and how ripe the pineapple was.

Since it's all white sugars, we can assume that everything has the potential to ferment out completely leaving you with about 11-12% ABV with full attenuation.

However, you used bread yeast, which has an unknown alcohol tolerance. I know some people use dry bread yeast for meads and achieve relatively high ABVs, while others claim bread yeast have problems surpassing 5-6%. My opinion on the subject is that it'll depend on what exactly the yeast is, and we just don't know. You also didn't use nutritional supplements, which will leave your yeast in less than optimal health.

Due to the unknown nature of your yeast, your final ABV will also be unknown. Most yeast will do 5-6% without problems, but when we make beer/cider/mead up to and past ~10% we usually have to deliberately pick yeast with high alcohol tolerance to ensure we get there.

My guess would be that you reach the alcohol tolerance of your yeast, and end up with a somewhat sweet product somewhere around 6-10% ABV.

If you do something like this again, I'd suggest you use a white wine or sparkling wine yeast since it will handle the alcohol and be happier in a high sucrose+fructose environment than baking- or brewer's yeast.

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So you have about 1kg of table sugar, and about 60g of fructose from the pineapple in a total of 5 liters of water. That should put your OG at around 1.080-1.085, depending on just how much and how ripe the pineapple was.

Since it's all white sugars, we can assume that everything has the potential to ferment out completely leaving you with about 12% ABV with full attenuation.

However, you used bread yeast, which has an unknown alcohol tolerance. I know some people use dry bread yeast for meads and achieve relatively high ABVs, while others claim bread yeast have problems surpassing 5-6%. My opinion on the subject is that it'll depend on what exactly the yeast is, and we just don't know. You also didn't use nutritional supplements, which will leave your yeast in less than optimal health.

Due to the unknown nature of your yeast, your final ABV will also be unknown. Most yeast will do 5-6% without problems, but when we make beer/cider/mead up to and past ~10% we usually have to deliberately pick yeast with high alcohol tolerance to ensure we get there.

My guess would be that you reach the alcohol tolerance of your yeast, and end up with a somewhat sweet product somewhere around 6-10% ABV.

If you do something like this again, I'd suggest you use a white wine or sparkling wine yeast since it will handle the alcohol and be happier in a high sucrose+fructose environment than baking- or brewer's yeast.