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It is not at all necessary to boil the malt extract "wort". It is only necessary to boil the hops. The hops can be boiled in water alone for the required 60-90 minutes or whatever time is needed for the various hop additions used. Once the "hop tea" is ready it can be strained into the fermentation vessel and rinsed with boiled water. If worried about sterility, one can dissolve the malt extract in just boiled water and add to the fermentation vessel - otherwise just pour it in and rinse can. So, boiled "hop tea", dissolved malt extract and whatever sugars are required are all in the fermentation vessel. Then add cold water to volume. Towards the end keep an eye on "wort" temperature. Below 15 degrees is not so good for pitching yeast and neither is above 30 degrees. 20 degrees is about right. When the mixture is good to go - pitch the yeast as normal. Even with a 90 min hop boil it should not be more than 2 hours from start to end.

If roasted grains are used in the beer for colour and/or flavour then steep the grains in (for example) boilingboiled water for between 20-60 mins and strain the grain into the fermentation vessel after the malt and hop tea.

Not boiling the malt is a safer and cheaper process to make fine beer.

It is not at all necessary to boil the malt extract "wort". It is only necessary to boil the hops. The hops can be boiled in water alone for the required 60-90 minutes or whatever time is needed for the various hop additions used. Once the "hop tea" is ready it can be strained into the fermentation vessel and rinsed with boiled water. If worried about sterility, one can dissolve the malt extract in just boiled water and add to the fermentation vessel - otherwise just pour it in and rinse can. So, boiled "hop tea", dissolved malt extract and whatever sugars are required are all in the fermentation vessel. Then add cold water to volume. Towards the end keep an eye on "wort" temperature. Below 15 degrees is not so good for pitching yeast and neither is above 30 degrees. 20 degrees is about right. When the mixture is good to go - pitch the yeast as normal. Even with a 90 min hop boil it should not be more than 2 hours from start to end.

If roasted grains are used in the beer for colour and/or flavour then steep the grains in (for example) boiling water for between 20-60 mins and strain the grain into the fermentation vessel after the malt and hop tea.

Not boiling the malt is a safer and cheaper process to make fine beer.

It is not at all necessary to boil the malt extract "wort". It is only necessary to boil the hops. The hops can be boiled in water alone for the required 60-90 minutes or whatever time is needed for the various hop additions used. Once the "hop tea" is ready it can be strained into the fermentation vessel and rinsed with boiled water. If worried about sterility, one can dissolve the malt extract in just boiled water and add to the fermentation vessel - otherwise just pour it in and rinse can. So, boiled "hop tea", dissolved malt extract and whatever sugars are required are all in the fermentation vessel. Then add cold water to volume. Towards the end keep an eye on "wort" temperature. Below 15 degrees is not so good for pitching yeast and neither is above 30 degrees. 20 degrees is about right. When the mixture is good to go - pitch the yeast as normal. Even with a 90 min hop boil it should not be more than 2 hours from start to end.

If roasted grains are used in the beer for colour and/or flavour then steep the grains in (for example) boiled water for between 20-60 mins and strain the grain into the fermentation vessel after the malt and hop tea.

Not boiling the malt is a safer and cheaper process to make fine beer.

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source | link

It is not at all necessary to boil the malt extract "wort". It is only necessary to boil the hops. The hops can be boiled in water alone for the required 60-90 minutes or whatever time is needed for the various hop additions used. Once the "hop tea" is ready it can be strained into the fermentation vessel and rinsed with boiled water. If worried about sterility, one can dissolve the malt extract in just boiled water and add to the fermentation vessel - otherwise just pour it in and rinse can. So, boiled "hop tea", dissolved malt extract and whatever sugars are required are all in the fermentation vessel. Then add cold water to volume. Towards the end keep an eye on "wort" temperature. Below 15 degrees is not so good for pitching yeast and neither is above 30 degrees. 20 degrees is about right. When the mixture is good to go - pitch the yeast as normal. Even with a 90 min hop boil it should not be more than 2 hours from start to end.

If roasted grains are used in the beer for colour and/or flavour then steep the grains in (for example) boiling water for between 20-60 mins and strain the grain into the fermentation vessel after the malt and hop tea.

Not boiling the malt is a safer and cheaper process to make fine beer.