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I have left beer in primary for over a month due to travel, etc. to no ill effects (assuming proper sanitation - problems will be more apparent given more time to infect). The only issue you may have is while the since the yeast flocculates and can be clearer, much of it will drop out of the wort into the trub. If you are bottle priming, this can cause carbonation to take much longer than usual. I have had it take months.

Priming can be sped up by agitating the closed bottles gently from time to time (semi-daily). Alternatively, you can help things out by simply sprinkling dry yeast (of the same type used in primary!) into the priming bucket to make sure sufficient yeast is present. I have also read about using champagne yeast for priming, but opinions seem to be be mixed

http://homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/1101/using-champagne-yeastUsing champagne yeast

I have left beer in primary for over a month due to travel, etc. to no ill effects (assuming proper sanitation - problems will be more apparent given more time to infect). The only issue you may have is while the since the yeast flocculates and can be clearer, much of it will drop out of the wort into the trub. If you are bottle priming, this can cause carbonation to take much longer than usual. I have had it take months.

Priming can be sped up by agitating the closed bottles gently from time to time (semi-daily). Alternatively, you can help things out by simply sprinkling dry yeast (of the same type used in primary!) into the priming bucket to make sure sufficient yeast is present. I have also read about using champagne yeast for priming, but opinions seem to be be mixed

http://homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/1101/using-champagne-yeast

I have left beer in primary for over a month due to travel, etc. to no ill effects (assuming proper sanitation - problems will be more apparent given more time to infect). The only issue you may have is while the since the yeast flocculates and can be clearer, much of it will drop out of the wort into the trub. If you are bottle priming, this can cause carbonation to take much longer than usual. I have had it take months.

Priming can be sped up by agitating the closed bottles gently from time to time (semi-daily). Alternatively, you can help things out by simply sprinkling dry yeast (of the same type used in primary!) into the priming bucket to make sure sufficient yeast is present. I have also read about using champagne yeast for priming, but opinions seem to be be mixed

Using champagne yeast

1
source | link

I have left beer in primary for over a month due to travel, etc. to no ill effects (assuming proper sanitation - problems will be more apparent given more time to infect). The only issue you may have is while the since the yeast flocculates and can be clearer, much of it will drop out of the wort into the trub. If you are bottle priming, this can cause carbonation to take much longer than usual. I have had it take months.

Priming can be sped up by agitating the closed bottles gently from time to time (semi-daily). Alternatively, you can help things out by simply sprinkling dry yeast (of the same type used in primary!) into the priming bucket to make sure sufficient yeast is present. I have also read about using champagne yeast for priming, but opinions seem to be be mixed

http://homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/1101/using-champagne-yeast