2 s/wheat bear/wheat beer/ :)
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  1. Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed original gravity that is not representative of the batch as a whole.

  2. For most beers you can do the entire fermentation in the plastic bucket. For strong beers that have an extended fermentation or aging period, transferring to the carboy separates the beer from the trub that fell to the bottom, which impact the flavour over long storage times.

    When using glass carboys there's always the real risk of breakage when lifting or moving the beer. The resulting injuries can be quite serious. If you decide to ferment in glass, you might want to consider keeping the carboy in a milk crate so you can lift it more safely.

    You don't need to worry about the 1 gallon of head-space in the fermentation bucket. The actively fermenting beer will quickly displace the oxygen with CO2. In the early stages of fermentation, when the yeast is multiplying, oxygen is actually beneficial -- a lot of home brewers deliberately oxygenate the wort before adding the yeast.

  3. To get wheat-beer flavour, you need to use wheat-bearbeer yeast. Both WYeast and White Labs offer a number of strains. If you're able to control the fermentation temperature, keeping it near the upper limit for the yeast will increase ester production -- making the beer more fruity.

  4. Only time will tell. My sanitization procedure is pretty sloppy when compared to some of the members of this site, and I've only lost two batches of beer to infection in over 10 years of brewing. Your beer is probably fine, but you'll know for sure one way or another in a week or two.

  1. Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed original gravity that is not representative of the batch as a whole.

  2. For most beers you can do the entire fermentation in the plastic bucket. For strong beers that have an extended fermentation or aging period, transferring to the carboy separates the beer from the trub that fell to the bottom, which impact the flavour over long storage times.

    When using glass carboys there's always the real risk of breakage when lifting or moving the beer. The resulting injuries can be quite serious. If you decide to ferment in glass, you might want to consider keeping the carboy in a milk crate so you can lift it more safely.

    You don't need to worry about the 1 gallon of head-space in the fermentation bucket. The actively fermenting beer will quickly displace the oxygen with CO2. In the early stages of fermentation, when the yeast is multiplying, oxygen is actually beneficial -- a lot of home brewers deliberately oxygenate the wort before adding the yeast.

  3. To get wheat-beer flavour, you need to use wheat-bear yeast. Both WYeast and White Labs offer a number of strains. If you're able to control the fermentation temperature, keeping it near the upper limit for the yeast will increase ester production -- making the beer more fruity.

  4. Only time will tell. My sanitization procedure is pretty sloppy when compared to some of the members of this site, and I've only lost two batches of beer to infection in over 10 years of brewing. Your beer is probably fine, but you'll know for sure one way or another in a week or two.

  1. Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed original gravity that is not representative of the batch as a whole.

  2. For most beers you can do the entire fermentation in the plastic bucket. For strong beers that have an extended fermentation or aging period, transferring to the carboy separates the beer from the trub that fell to the bottom, which impact the flavour over long storage times.

    When using glass carboys there's always the real risk of breakage when lifting or moving the beer. The resulting injuries can be quite serious. If you decide to ferment in glass, you might want to consider keeping the carboy in a milk crate so you can lift it more safely.

    You don't need to worry about the 1 gallon of head-space in the fermentation bucket. The actively fermenting beer will quickly displace the oxygen with CO2. In the early stages of fermentation, when the yeast is multiplying, oxygen is actually beneficial -- a lot of home brewers deliberately oxygenate the wort before adding the yeast.

  3. To get wheat-beer flavour, you need to use wheat-beer yeast. Both WYeast and White Labs offer a number of strains. If you're able to control the fermentation temperature, keeping it near the upper limit for the yeast will increase ester production -- making the beer more fruity.

  4. Only time will tell. My sanitization procedure is pretty sloppy when compared to some of the members of this site, and I've only lost two batches of beer to infection in over 10 years of brewing. Your beer is probably fine, but you'll know for sure one way or another in a week or two.

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  1. Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed original gravity that is not representative of the batch as a whole.

  2. For most beers you can do the entire fermentation in the plastic bucket. For strong beers that have an extended fermentation or aging period, transferring to the carboy separates the beer from the trub that fell to the bottom, which impact the flavour over long storage times.

    When using glass carboys there's always the real risk of breakage when lifting or moving the beer. The resulting injuries can be quite serious. If you decide to ferment in glass, you might want to consider keeping the carboy in a milk crate so you can lift it more safely.

    You don't need to worry about the 1 gallon of head-space in the fermentation bucket. The actively fermenting beer will quickly displace the oxygen with CO2. In the early stages of fermentation, when the yeast is multiplying, oxygen is actually beneficial -- a lot of home brewers deliberately oxygenate the wort before adding the yeast.

  3. To get wheat-beer flavour, you need to use wheat-bear yeast. Both WYeast and White Labs offer a number of strains. If you're able to control the fermentation temperature, keeping it near the upper limit for the yeast will increase ester production -- making the beer more fruity.

  4. Only time will tell. My sanitization procedure is pretty sloppy when compared to some of the members of this site, and I've only lost two batches of beer to infection in over 10 years of brewing. Your beer is probably fine, but you'll know for sure one way or another in a week or two.