2 Added link and reference to yeast pitching rate calculator.
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A few thoughts, and I hope I can answer your question in the process:

  • The only fermentables to speak of will be your malt extracts — the other grain is just adjuncts and will not contribute a significant amount of long-chain sugars for fermentation. So you can pretty much rule out the mash. But as to your malt extract, is it fresh? Do you have any reason to suspect it may be old or have been sitting on the shelf for a long time? Age will affect flavor.

  • Are you oxygenating your wort? Your beers may be petering out due to insufficient oxygen and the yeast is unable to reach optimal attenuation.

  • Are you using yeast nutrients? If not, consider adding yeast nutrient in the last 15 minutes of the boil to help contribute to the development of a healthy cell wall in your yeast cells. This will also help for a complete fermentation.

  • Also, check with the yeast manufacturer for it's potential attenuation range — often you'll have yeast that have a potential attenuation range of 70-75% for example. Use the formula attenuation = (OG - FG) / OG to gauge your apparent attenuation and compare that to what the yeast manufacturer's stated range is.

  • Also look into your yeast handling. If you're consistently having issues with under-attenuation, maybe consider adding yeast starters into the equation and see if that helps with your attenuation issues. An be sure to use a yeast pitching calculator to estimate how much yeast you may need for your recipe/batch. Every recipe is different and may require more or less yeast to start with.

Hope this helps! See this article on BYO.com for some more information on attenuation issues.

Edited: added link and reference to yeast pitching rate calculator.

A few thoughts, and I hope I can answer your question in the process:

  • The only fermentables to speak of will be your malt extracts — the other grain is just adjuncts and will not contribute a significant amount of long-chain sugars for fermentation. So you can pretty much rule out the mash. But as to your malt extract, is it fresh? Do you have any reason to suspect it may be old or have been sitting on the shelf for a long time? Age will affect flavor.

  • Are you oxygenating your wort? Your beers may be petering out due to insufficient oxygen and the yeast is unable to reach optimal attenuation.

  • Are you using yeast nutrients? If not, consider adding yeast nutrient in the last 15 minutes of the boil to help contribute to the development of a healthy cell wall in your yeast cells. This will also help for a complete fermentation.

  • Also, check with the yeast manufacturer for it's potential attenuation range — often you'll have yeast that have a potential attenuation range of 70-75% for example. Use the formula attenuation = (OG - FG) / OG to gauge your apparent attenuation and compare that to what the yeast manufacturer's stated range is.

  • Also look into your yeast handling. If you're consistently having issues with under-attenuation, maybe consider adding yeast starters into the equation and see if that helps with your attenuation issues.

Hope this helps! See this article on BYO.com for some more information on attenuation issues.

A few thoughts, and I hope I can answer your question in the process:

  • The only fermentables to speak of will be your malt extracts — the other grain is just adjuncts and will not contribute a significant amount of long-chain sugars for fermentation. So you can pretty much rule out the mash. But as to your malt extract, is it fresh? Do you have any reason to suspect it may be old or have been sitting on the shelf for a long time? Age will affect flavor.

  • Are you oxygenating your wort? Your beers may be petering out due to insufficient oxygen and the yeast is unable to reach optimal attenuation.

  • Are you using yeast nutrients? If not, consider adding yeast nutrient in the last 15 minutes of the boil to help contribute to the development of a healthy cell wall in your yeast cells. This will also help for a complete fermentation.

  • Also, check with the yeast manufacturer for it's potential attenuation range — often you'll have yeast that have a potential attenuation range of 70-75% for example. Use the formula attenuation = (OG - FG) / OG to gauge your apparent attenuation and compare that to what the yeast manufacturer's stated range is.

  • Also look into your yeast handling. If you're consistently having issues with under-attenuation, maybe consider adding yeast starters into the equation and see if that helps with your attenuation issues. An be sure to use a yeast pitching calculator to estimate how much yeast you may need for your recipe/batch. Every recipe is different and may require more or less yeast to start with.

Hope this helps! See this article on BYO.com for some more information on attenuation issues.

Edited: added link and reference to yeast pitching rate calculator.

1
source | link

A few thoughts, and I hope I can answer your question in the process:

  • The only fermentables to speak of will be your malt extracts — the other grain is just adjuncts and will not contribute a significant amount of long-chain sugars for fermentation. So you can pretty much rule out the mash. But as to your malt extract, is it fresh? Do you have any reason to suspect it may be old or have been sitting on the shelf for a long time? Age will affect flavor.

  • Are you oxygenating your wort? Your beers may be petering out due to insufficient oxygen and the yeast is unable to reach optimal attenuation.

  • Are you using yeast nutrients? If not, consider adding yeast nutrient in the last 15 minutes of the boil to help contribute to the development of a healthy cell wall in your yeast cells. This will also help for a complete fermentation.

  • Also, check with the yeast manufacturer for it's potential attenuation range — often you'll have yeast that have a potential attenuation range of 70-75% for example. Use the formula attenuation = (OG - FG) / OG to gauge your apparent attenuation and compare that to what the yeast manufacturer's stated range is.

  • Also look into your yeast handling. If you're consistently having issues with under-attenuation, maybe consider adding yeast starters into the equation and see if that helps with your attenuation issues.

Hope this helps! See this article on BYO.com for some more information on attenuation issues.