22,464 reputation
21548
bio website
location Norway
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 2 hours ago

AG brewer since 2007. Current rig is a clone plus extras of http://theelectricbrewery.com. I like most styles of beer.

Projects in progress are a custom kegbot that tracks beer consumption without a flowmeter, a brewpi fermentation controller and a digital specific gravity meter.


Jun
27
comment Hop extract substitution
+1 wish I could vote twice - I would have written the same.
Jun
27
revised Improving Your Brewing Significantly
fixed title
Jun
27
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Where to get Old Brew Recipes
Jun
26
comment List of Errors in Fix's Principles of Brewing Science
You know, there are two editions. Maybe the 2nd one is better?
Jun
25
reviewed No Action Needed My ferment has small black specs in it, is this an infection?
Jun
25
comment High OG content for yeast
There's not much point pitching new yeast after 48h. The flavor contributions from the propagation are now already in the beer.
Jun
25
revised High OG content for yeast
clarification with new info received in the comments
Jun
25
comment High OG content for yeast
@anton2g - thanks for the info - these kind of details would have been useful in your original question. I assumed dry yeast. If you can get hold of another smakpack with the same strain and can pitch within 24h then that's worth doing. 1 pack/100 billion cells is a serious underpitch, assuming a 5 gallon batch - mrmalty recommends 2.8 vials/smackpacks.
Jun
25
comment High OG content for yeast
Oh come on - downvote a whole answer because of one statement? That's what the comments are for. This isn't one cell - it's 200 billion. And, even from 1 cell the yeast will eventually multiply but it will just take too long. The case here, an underpitch by 25%, is easily made up by just a quarter of the yeast propagating, which will take 3-8 hours. Most people underpitch by way more than this when pitching a vial/smackpack directly and they make acceptable beer. My statement is correct - the yeast will multiply, and consistent with a slight underpitch there may be more esters.
Jun
25
answered High OG content for yeast
Jun
25
revised Non-plastic siphon tube
the tubing is not made of silicon - it's silicone! :)
Jun
24
comment High OG content for yeast
Any other details about the yeast, such as the manufacturer, production/use by date. Did it come with a kit? In general, it should be ok, but there may be exceptions! Can you also confirm you've calibrated your hydrometer, and stirred the wort to ensure it's uniformly mixed, or can some how account for the increase in SG? It may be that the SG is not actually higher, but the measurements are off.
Jun
24
reviewed No Action Needed Honey addition to dunkel
Jun
24
comment Going Below Optimum Yeast Temperatures (For Ale in Particular)
Just to be clear - I'm not saying you can't ferment at 60F, if that was the constant fermentation temperature from the outset, but rather, that you should not drop the temp from 72F to 60F as there's a good chance the yeast will drop out from the temp decrease.
Jun
24
comment Going Below Optimum Yeast Temperatures (For Ale in Particular)
It's not the ferementation temp that's so critical, but the temperature swing downwards. Sure you can ferment many yeast under the specified range if you hold the temp constant, but if you suddenly drop the temp from 72F to 60F there is a good chance the yeast will drop out and not finish up, particularly if this is towards the end of the ferment when there is less food available.
Jun
23
revised Going Below Optimum Yeast Temperatures (For Ale in Particular)
added 576 characters in body
Jun
23
reviewed Approve suggested edit on I have a keg, now what?
Jun
22
comment Calculating carbon dioxide production during fermentation
+1 Perfect answer, especially with the link.
Jun
21
comment Going Below Optimum Yeast Temperatures (For Ale in Particular)
WY1214 is notorious for dropping out if the temperature takes a downward turn. You're talking about ambient temp - I'm talking about beer temp, which will often be 10F above ambient. So a ambient temp of 60F is not the same as a beer temp of 60F.
Jun
21
comment Going Below Optimum Yeast Temperatures (For Ale in Particular)
If you have temperature control, it's a general recommendation for most ale yeasts, particularly if they have a relatively high minimum temp (e.g. 68-70F.) For more hardy ale yeasts, like WLP001/WY1056/S05, it doesn't really matter, since they are typically fermented well above their minimum.