801 reputation
511
bio website santeadairius.com
location Santa Cruz, CA
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 6 months
seen Dec 19 '11 at 3:55

18 years homebrewing, started in college when I was 20 because I was too young to buy beer but figured out that you could buy the ingredients...

Owner/winemaker for Sante Arcangeli Family Wines in Santa Cruz, CA. Sante is a "micro winery" producing 500 cases/year of carefully handcrafted Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from rare mountain vineyards in Bonny Doon and the Sonoma Coast.

Co-owner/Co-founder/Fermentation Facilitator of Sante Adairius Rustic Ales in Santa Cruz California.

Day job: owner of iluminada design, a web development firm in Santa Cruz.

Currently totally infatuated with brewing barrel-aged IPAs.


Dec
19
comment Overly Active Fermentation
Yeah, with gravity and temp like that an IPA yeast like 1056 will go totally nuts. Just relax, don't worry, have a homebrew. If you want to really mess with it, set the carboy in a bathtub of cold water for a couple of hours next time, try to get the temp down a bit. That beer would have been into the high 70s at least at the peak of fermentation, which will generate some off aromas, potentially.
Dec
19
comment What can I do with my spent grain after mashing?
I compost it. We've got goat farmers at our local farmer's market who like to feed it to their goats, and then we get the goat cheese. But bread is good too.
Dec
19
comment Will my session beer be OK for 5-6 weeks in primary?
It'll be fine, just don't open the fermentor and let any o2 in.
Jun
29
comment What would happen if I used a yeast meant for white wine to brew red wine or vice versa?
PJreddie is right. All wine yeast is still Saccharomyces and will ferment your juice or must, but science has identified certain strains that accentuate specific flavors that benefit certain grape varietals. Of course, you can always let it "go native" and ferment on native yeast. I've done this with success for a few years now. Just make sure your must's pH is below 3.75 (3.3 - 3.8), cover your must with cheesecloth to keep flies out, and the dominant ambient yeast that's best for your varietal will take over and ferment you dry.
Jun
16
comment What is this white stuff on the surface of my beer?
Crap I posted an answer but somehow missed this one. I think Chez is right about the lipids. Not ideal but No big deal.
Jun
16
comment Short boil and DMS
Room3 is right-- pilsner malt is often the culprit behind dms if the boil was short. You'll probably be fine. Smell and taste it after primary. If it tastes decent, you can probably save it by dry hopping the hell out of it.
Mar
26
comment Riwaka Hops: Where to get 'em
Yeah, our local shop has some rare hops, like Nelson, but none of the others I'm looking for right now.
Mar
25
comment Whoops, I over-primed. Anything I can do?
I was going to answer with "just drink it all quickly and burp a lot", but voted this answer up the chain instead. I've popped tops and re-capped before without a sanitation issue, especially with a beer that's got some good alcohol in it to keep infection risk down.
Jan
15
comment Why do all my beers taste better after having aged for a couple months?
+1 I've found that really hoppy IPAs are best fresh because the hop aromas blow off after a couple of months in the bottle. Most everything else that has 6% or more alcohol seems like it'll age out. Brett beers and lacto-infected beers, barrel aged beers, etc like aging most of the time, as long as the brew was clean to begin with.
Jan
15
comment What is the best beer to make for a spouse who prefers sauvignon blanc?
+1 to the Nelson Sauvin answer. I recently had a Belgian-style pale from Allagash that was brewed with Nelson and it was incredible and very wine-like. If she doesn't mind bitterness, try to get ahold of some of Alpine Beer Co's "Nelson" to get a sense for what this hop can do. I'm a winemaker and like to brew with Nelson Sauvin because of it's wine-like characteristics.
Dec
14
comment If a vial of yeast is at room temperature for 3 days then put back in the refrigerator, is it still viable?
I agree. The thing about yeast is that the real hard part is getting it to not ferment sugars into alcohol. Unless it hit some extreme temps, it's probably hungry as hell by now, because it's been awake for a few days. I'd make a starter with it whether you're using it right away or not-- you can make a starter, wait for the cells to go dormant again and then pour off the beer and save the remaining yeast to a sanitized jar to store in your fridge for next time. So you'll have propagated the yeast while ensuring it's viable.
Oct
26
comment Capturing wild yeasts?
Yeah, it's a wine yeast, from one perspective, which is also basically the same thing as an ale yeast. I think we're dealing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae either way. Meaning, it'll ferment into a funky farmhouse-style beer, most likely. The difference being that my culture came from un-inoculated wine-- so it was the native yeast that came in on the skins, so there's a variety in there, to be sure. It'll be top-fermenting either way.
Oct
19
comment Capturing wild yeasts?
ps adding some Fermaid K yeast nutrients will help this all along.
Oct
19
comment Growlers v 12oz Bottles
I bottle into growlers all the time. Just use slightly less bottling sugar than the recipe calls for. I usually use 2 cups of DME when bottling 12 gallons. I've never had one explode on me. pop oops, there went one out in the garage. Murphy's Law. Or something. Actually, the ones with rubber stoppers will usually just seep out of the top rather than explode if they're over carbonated. Don't worry about it. Also, I highly recommend brewing a cheesecloth farmhouse ale in memory of your granddad.
Sep
9
comment What is on top of my wort? Mold? Lacto?
I've read that there are a few bugs that can grow in beer (low alcohol ones) that can make you mildly sick (blow ass), but that the beer will taste absolutely awful/undrinkable. If your beer tastes alright, then whatever bugs those are... well... you've probably drank 'em before. I think it's lacto with maybe a mold kicker.
Aug
1
comment Barrel Aging- How Many Times Can I Use One?
Due to the higher alcohol and lower pH of wine, tannin extraction happens relatively quickly. After 3 years use (at least for Pinot Noir, which you only age for around 1 year), the barrel is considered "neutral" in that it doesn't impart any more oak tannin to your wine. I figured with beer, being more alkaline and less alcoholic, you might get 6-10 uses from a barrel before it's neutral. Since I'm not making native sour beers, I'm not trying to get "the funk" from the barrel, just oak for a traditional barrel-aged IPA. I'm going to go with the guess and check technique, see what happens.
Jul
31
comment Fermenator Question(s)
Soaking the valves in acetone followed by a good cleaning with PBW and a sanitizer soak did the trick. Bottled a batch of IPA tonight.
Jul
19
comment What are the effects of a watery mash?
Great question, great answers. I've always wondered about this and now I know. Thanks to all.
Jul
17
comment Fermenator Question(s)
Yep, it's oil. Talked to Blichmann and they were very helpful. Apparently they had a batch of oily valves and notified their customers (stores) about it, but my brew shop hadn't gotten the word. You have to disassemble the valves and soak them in acetone to get the oil out. Going to do so tomorrow and then brew again, so will update this post if that resolved the issue.
Jul
14
comment Estimating Alpha Acids of Home Grown Hops
I'd be interested to know what lab to send to because I'm growing a lot of hops. If anyone has info about this, fire away. I know of many wine analysis labs, but have never encountered a hop analysis lab.