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May
12
comment Looking for a WARM ginger beer
Good to know about the nutrient, after mine finished high I thought about that being part of the issue. The brewer that shared the recipe with me also advised sweetening it up with sugar to taste, but that was from a keg (no worries about bottle bombs as long as the keg stays chilled). Adding simple syrup when you open a bottle would be the safe approach, I suppose. It definately is a drink to be careful with--packs a lot of kick but goes does very, very easily (especially on a summer day). Cheers!
May
12
comment Looking for a WARM ginger beer
Glad you liked it so far, I updated my answer with a few notes. My batch didn't fully finish and struggled to bottle-carbonate; if possible I'd highly recommend force-carbing. Otherwise just batch prime and bottle as usual--if your FG was comparable to beers then any carb calculator should be find to use. If your FG is on the high side then play it safe and go for a lower volume of CO2 to avoid bottle bombs--carb for a couple weeks at room temperature then fridge them up and drink them down.
May
12
revised Looking for a WARM ginger beer
Added some follow-up notes
May
12
revised Looking for a WARM ginger beer
Lowered the sugar in the recipe, my batch didn't full finish
Jan
30
answered Looking for a WARM ginger beer
Jan
28
comment How can I filter out a large amount of loose sediment from my primary?
I think you hit the nail on the head, I'll find a bucket to borrow and rack the beer and ginger bits onto sanitized cloth. Maybe next time I'll try doing primary with the cloth in place
Jan
27
comment How can I filter out a large amount of loose sediment from my primary?
This is pretty much what I'd been thinking, but I'm hesitant to pour it through a sieve/cloth since that'll likely aerate it quite a bit
Jan
27
revised How can I filter out a large amount of loose sediment from my primary?
edited title
Jan
27
asked How can I filter out a large amount of loose sediment from my primary?
Jan
3
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
1
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
11
revised Excessive foam when pouring from bottle
added 391 characters in body
Jun
11
answered Excessive foam when pouring from bottle
Jun
11
comment Remove smell from barrel
I'm with Sander--although I also haven't tried it with brewing equipment and there's a chance you'll get some citrus scent. Maybe time for a hefe? :D
Jun
11
comment first stage beer seems slow (stopped?)
Also, unrelated, but you could try batch-priming rather than adding the sugar directly to the bottle. To batch prime you measure your priming sugar for the entire batch and dissolve it into a small amount of boiling water, then cool it and add it to the finished beer, gently stir, and bottle from there. It helps ensure more consistent carbonation and also sterilizes and fully dissolves the sugar. If you try it be sure to rack your beer off the trub before adding the sugar-water--since you need to give it a gentle stir you don't want trub on the bottom or you'll be adding it to your bottles.
Jun
11
comment first stage beer seems slow (stopped?)
You can take your OG reading after cooling the wort and pitching the yeast. Your FG reading is whatever gravity your fermentation stops at before bottling.
Jun
11
comment first stage beer seems slow (stopped?)
No problem. Gravity readings basically measure sugar-levels, so the FG (final gravity) is very dependent on what you're brewing. A dry and strong beer can actually finish below 1.000 (I've heard, never seen) and sweet beers can finish above 1.010. You'll also likely see OG's and FG's listed on recipes which give you a good way to double-check if you brewed accurately. If you miss your OG you can adjust your wort (a bit) by adding more sugars or water (boiled, of course). The difference between a OG and FG will also tell you the alcohol level.
Jun
11
revised first stage beer seems slow (stopped?)
fixed typos
Jun
11
comment Will this fermenter explode?
I'd second this. Contamination typically happens when particulate falls in from above (this isnt specific to beer), so loosely covering it should be fine until the fermentation slows.