111 reputation
5
bio website empiricales.com
location United States
age 28
visits member for 8 months
seen Apr 8 at 16:57

I am currently the manager of Modern Homebrew Emporium in Cambridge, MA where I have been working for the past two years. I also worked at a brewery in Boston for almost three years in various positions: as a production intern (cleaning and filling casks), on the bottling line, driving forklift, and giving tours.

I like most styles of beer, but especially enjoy brewing Amber Ales, Stouts, and Belgian-style beers.


Feb
13
comment Thoughts on increasing flavor of blueberry wine
Sorry to hear that. It's mostly in the aroma, and the blueberry honey I've used has a pretty intense blueberry character. The brand I use is Dutch Gold. Hope it works out for you!
Feb
10
revised Thoughts on increasing flavor of blueberry wine
added 5 characters in body
Feb
10
comment Why exactly does cold crashing work?
Hmm, that's interesting. Thanks for the numbers. I have learned something new today!
Feb
9
answered Thoughts on increasing flavor of blueberry wine
Feb
9
answered Steel Cut v. Flaked Oats
Feb
8
comment Why exactly does cold crashing work?
In my experience, the heat generated by the yeast after fermentation is negligible. I'd be curious so see a source to support your claim that significant convection continues post fermentation.
Feb
4
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
4
awarded  Editor
Feb
4
revised Why exactly does cold crashing work?
added 8 characters in body
Feb
4
comment Why exactly does cold crashing work?
While it's true that the heat of yeast metabolism causes mixing during the active part of the fermentation, this is not really a factor after the fermentation is complete. Also, at the time of serving, there should be no yeast activity causing convection. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding. Could you please clarify?
Feb
4
answered Why exactly does cold crashing work?
Feb
3
answered Saving yeast in growler
Feb
3
answered Do I have an infection?
Feb
3
awarded  Supporter
Feb
2
comment When and how should I add Maltodextrin
A lot of it is experience. I always taste the beer at the bottling stage anyway. This won't give you a perfect sense of how the beer is going to taste, but you can swish it around in your mouth, and get a pretty good sense of the aroma and mouthfeel. Perhaps start with 1/4 lb maltodextrin and go from there. Alternatively, if you're feeling sciencey, you can add measured amounts of maltodextrin to several samples of beer. I don't usually add powders directly to bottles because it's hard to do it accurately, but for maltodextrin that's not as big of a problem as with priming sugar...
Feb
1
awarded  Teacher
Jan
31
answered When and how should I add Maltodextrin
Jan
31
answered Are there any tricks for removing labels from bottles?
Jan
31
awarded  Informed
Jan
31
answered Why is my wort dark?